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Dirty dining: Bradenton restaurant closed after inspector finds more than 100 roaches

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspections report of Manatee County restaurants, Holly’s Quarter Cup Cafe was temporarily shut down when an inspector discovered live and dead roaches on the premises.

A handful of local restaurants were cited for issues related to storing or cooking food at safe temperatures.

Holly’s Quarter Cup Cafe, 5911 53rd Ave. E., Bradenton

  • An inspector visited Holly’s Quarter Cup Cafe on Feb. 13 for a licensing callback inspection because the establishment was operating without a license from the Division of Hotels and Restaurants. During the visit, the inspector found signs of roach activity.
  • Approximately 50 trapped and dead roaches were observed behind an ice machine on the floor.
  • An inspector observed approximately 43 more dead roaches throughout the kitchen and at a wait station. The restaurant operator discarded most of the roaches.

  • An inspector observed 24 live roaches throughout the establishment. The restaurant operator killed and discarded most of the roaches.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade.
  • The restaurant’s food manager certification was expired.
  • There was no currently certified food manager on duty with four or more employees engaged in food preparation.
  • Hot water an employee handwash sink did not reach 100 degrees.
  • No soap was provided at an employee handwash sink on the cook line.

  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.
  • A follow-up inspection was required. During a follow-up inspection on Feb. 14, an inspector observed five dead roaches and three live roaches. The inspector ordered that the facility be temporarily closed.
  • The restaurant met inspection standards during a follow-up visit on Feb. 16 and was allowed to reopen.

Anna Maria Oyster Bar on the Pier, 200 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach

  • Scallops that were cold held overnight measured at a temperature greater than 41 degrees. A stop sale was issued and the food was discarded.
  • A purse was stored with food in a dry storage area. Corrective action was taken.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizer solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed.

Five Guys Burgers and Fries, 6783 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton

  • There was water on the floor of a walk-in cooler. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee drink was stored in the walk-in cooler. Corrective action was taken.
  • The establishment was operating without a license from the Division of Hotels and Restaurants.

Jersey Mike’s Subs, 4020 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • A meat display case was leaking water into a customer food line, according to an inspector. A vent in the ceiling of a walk-in cooler was also leaking water.
  • There was no soap provided at an employee handwash sink. Corrective action was taken.

Denise’s Beachway Cafe, 7224 Manatee Ave., Bradenton

  • Tongs were stored on an equipment door handle in between uses. Corrective action was taken.
  • The establishment was operating with an expired Division of Hotels and Restaurants license.
  • Egg salad, chicken salad and tuna salad were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. A stop sale was issued and the food was discarded.
  • Cutting boards in the cooking and preparation areas were stained/soiled.
  • There was no currently certified food service manager on duty with four or more employees engaged in food preparation/handling.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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Ryan Ballogg covers arts, entertainment, dining, breaking and local news for the Bradenton Herald. He won first place for feature writing in the Florida Press Club’s 2018 Excellence in Journalism Competition. Ryan is a Florida native and graduated from University of South Florida St. Petersburg.


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