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More dirty dining: Flying insects, cook with open wound found at these restaurants

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspections report of Manatee County restaurants, multiple establishments had issues related to employee handwashing and cleanliness.

Several restaurants were also cited for storing food or service items on the floor.

Peach’s Restaurant, 5702 Cortez Road W., Bradenton

  • A cook with an open wrist sore was observed at work in the establishment. An inspector educated the cook and a manager on proper health safeguards.
  • A cook was observed touching eye glasses three times and rubbing nose before preparing onions. Corrective action was taken.

  • An inspector observed three cutting boards that had deep cuts and were no longer cleanable.
  • Single service articles were improperly stored. Corrective action was taken.
  • Food was observed in a handwash sink.
  • A handwash sink was not accessible for employee use due to a sanitizer bucket stored inside. Corrective action was taken.

SketchDaddy’s Wings ‘n Things, 7814 Cortez Road W., Bradenton

  • An inspector observed three flying insects near a three-compartment sink.
  • Cole slaw date-marked as more than a week old was on site. A cook discarded the food.
  • The ceiling was in disrepair. An inspector observed a bulging ceiling tile near a three-compartment sink.
  • Eight jugs of oil were stored on the floor. A cook moved them to a shelf.
  • Grease was accumulated on kitchen walls.

Subway, 5810 Ranch Lake Blvd., Bradenton

  • A bag of banana peppers was stored on the floor.
  • The restaurant was operating with an expired Division of Hotels and Restaurants license.

Wasabi Steakhouse, 5770 Ranch Lake Blvd. #116, Bradenton

  • After a previous citation for employees handling ready-to-eat food with bare hands, an inspector again observed the issue during a follow-up visit.
  • A sushi chef was observed handling tuna that was to be observed raw with bare hands. In the kitchen, a cook was observed handling washed and cut lettuce with bare hands.

Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, 3390 First St., Bradenton

  • Fried chicken was reaching a minimum internal temperature of 165 degrees.
  • Pipes were observed leaking onto the floor.
  • Boxes of single-use cups were stored on the floor.

Hungry Howie’s, 103 301 Blvd. W., Bradenton

  • An employee handled soiled dishes and then handled clean dishes without first washing hands. Corrective action was taken.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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