Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Inspectors report issues at several Bradenton-area fast-food joints

During the most recent inspections of Manatee County, several area fast food restaurants were cited for employee handwashing issues and moldy equipment.

Other restaurants lacked proof of proper training for employees or management.

Here’s what inspectors found.

Arby’s, 3608 First St., Bradenton

  • An employee was observed making face contact with a gloved hand and then engaging in food preparation without a hand wash or glove change.
  • Hot water at sinks in the men’s and women’s restrooms did not reach 100 degrees.
  • A manager lacked proof of food manager certification and no other certified food service manager was employed at the location.

  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.
  • There was a grease buildup under the fryer station.
  • A wet wiping cloth was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

Culver’s, 5750 Ranch Lake Blvd., Bradenton

  • An employee failed to wash hands when necessary, according to an inspector.
  • There was an accumulation of black/green mold-like substance at the interior of an ice machine.
  • Hot water was not provided at a sink in the men’s restroom.
  • There was a buildup of grease on hood filters above a griddle.
  • Reach-in coolers throughout the kitchen had gaskets that were soiled with a slimy/mold-like buildup.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

Chick-fil-A, 4573 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • Sliced tomatoes and colby and monterey jack cheese were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • A wet wiping cloth was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses.

  • There was no proof of required training for two employees hired more than 60 days prior.
  • Cases of hash browns and bags of ice were stored on the floor of a walk-in freezer. Corrective action was taken.
  • Reach-in cooler shelves were pitted with rust.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

BEHIND OUR REPORTING

Why did we report this story?

Each week, the Bradenton Herald reviews data of restaurants that have been recently inspected in Manatee County. Local public health departments regularly inspect businesses serving food to ensure restaurants and other food retail outlets are following safe food handling procedures.

Little Caesars Pizza, 4919 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • Shredded mozzarella and pizza sauce were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illness and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • The person in charge was unable to answer basic food code questions pertaining to the safe operation of the establishment, according to an inspector. The person in charge not aware of cold holding temperature requirements. An inspector advised the restaurant operator that required temperature for cold holding is 41 degrees or less.

  • There was no proof of required training for an employee hired more than 60 days prior.
  • No test kit was at hand to measure the strength of sanitizer in use for warewashing.
  • The floor was soiled in a food preparation area and under a three-compartment sink.
  • The floor of a walk-in cooler was soiled.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were encrusted with food debris.
  • The restaurant met inspection standards.

Subway, 6041 26th St. W., Bradenton

  • Brisket, sliced ham, sliced turkey, provolone cheese and Swiss cheese were being cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • An inspector observed processed shredded lettuce being held at room temperature.
  • There was no proof of required training for an employee hired more than 60 days prior.
  • The restaurant met inspection standards.

Subway, 4270 53rd Ave. E., Bradenton

  • The ice chute on a self-service drink machine had a buildup of mold-like substance/slime.
  • Rotisserie chicken and sliced provolone cheese were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were soiled with encrusted food debris.
  • The restaurant met inspection standards.

Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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