Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Rodents, roaches and flies shut down an Italian restaurant

According to the latest inspection report of Manatee County, Cafe Amalfi in Bradenton was shut down by inspectors after rodent, roach and fly activity was observed on site.

Other Bradenton-area restaurants were cited for issues including dirty surfaces, unsafe food temperatures and lack of employee training.

Here’s what inspectors found:

Cafe Amalfi, 6703 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • An inspector ordered that Cafe Amalfi in Bradenton be temporarily shut down on Aug. 13 after observing signs of rodent and roach activity on site.
  • An inspector observed approximately five dead roaches at the bottom cabinet at a wait station.
  • Two live roaches were observed at the bottom wait station cabinet, and another was spotted in a warewashing area.
  • Approximately 10 roach eggs, and roach droppings too numerous to count, were present in the bottom wait station cabinet.
  • An inspector observed approximately 78 rodent droppings at the interior of the bottom wait station cabinet. Approximately 20 more were observed in a dry storage room.

  • An inspector observed approximately 10 flying insects in the establishment.
  • Multiple ceiling tiles were ajar.
  • There was a hole in the ceiling at the dry storage area and another hole in the ceiling above a water heater.
  • There was a hole approximately 10 inches in length at the interior of the bottom wait station cabinet.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.

  • In-use tongs were stored on an equipment door handle in between uses.
  • There was standing or slow-draining water in a handwash sink.
  • Multiple walls were soiled.
  • Dishmachine sanitizer was not at the proper minimum strength. Corrective action was taken.
  • Meatballs, mozzarella cheese and pizza sauce were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. The foods were moved to a cooler capable of maintaining the proper temperature.
  • Pizza at the front counter that was supposed to be held using time as a public health control had no time marking, and the time that it was removed from temperature control could not be determined.
  • An inspector observed raw chicken stored over raw veal. The raw animal foods were not stored based upon minimum required cooking temperature. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee handwash sink was blocked by a garbage can. Corrective action was taken.
  • Hot water at an employee handwash sink did not reach 100 degrees.
  • Hot water was not provided at a handwash sink in an employee restroom. Corrective action was taken.
  • Lasagna that was prepared on site, held at refrigeration temperature and then frozen for future use was not being properly date-marked.
  • Required employee training was expired for some employees.
  • During a follow-up inspection on Aug. 14, an inspector observed three live roaches, one dead roach and between 40 to 50 roach droppings.
  • Six rodent droppings were observed in the dry storage area.
  • Four flying insects were observed on site.
  • The restaurant remained shut down.
  • During a second follow-up visit on Aug. 14, an inspector observed three live roaches and roach droppings too numerous to count at the bottom wait station cabinet.
  • The restaurant remained shut down.
  • During a follow-up visit on Aug. 16, an inspector observed two live roaches. A restaurant operator killed and discarded the roaches.
  • Two roach eggs were observed. A restaurant operator discarded the roach eggs.
  • As of Aug. 16, the restaurant remained shut down.

Chuck E. Cheese, 905 44th Ave. W., Bradenton

  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation. Corrective action was taken.
  • Single service items on the cook line were not stored protected from contamination. Corrective action was taken.
  • Potato salad, macaroni salad and cottage cheese on the salad bar were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • A toxic substance was stored by or with food. Corrective action was taken.
  • No probe thermometer was at hand to measure the temperature of food products.
  • There was no test kit at hand to measure the strength of sanitizer in use for warewashing.
  • During a follow-up visit on Aug. 15, an inspector again observed foods being held at unsafe temperatures. Diced ham, potato salad, macaroni salad and cottage cheese on the salad bar were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Another follow-up inspection was required.

BEHIND OUR REPORTING

Why did we report this story?

Each week, the Bradenton Herald reviews data of restaurants that have been recently inspected in Manatee County. Local public health departments regularly inspect businesses serving food to ensure restaurants and other food retail outlets are following safe food handling procedures.

Steak ‘n Shake, 106 Cortez Road W., Bradenton

  • During a follow-up visit for previous citations, an inspector again observed dirty surfaces throughout the restaurant.
  • A floor drain near the drive-through window was soiled with a black, encrusted substance.
  • The floors under a warewashing area and under the cook line were soiled with a black, encrusted substance.
  • Walls on the cook line and at a milkshake preparation area were soiled with food.
  • Another follow-up inspection was required.

Clean Juice, 5215 University Parkway # 104, Sarasota

  • Cut melon was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees.
  • Watermelon that had been cut more than a week prior was still in use. A stop sale was issued.
  • No probe thermometer was at hand to measure the temperature of food products.
  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.

Burger King, 3235 University Parkway, Sarasota

  • The ice chute on a self-service drink machine was soiled with mold-like substance/slime.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were encrusted with food debris.
  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.
  • There was no proof of required training for an employee hired more than days prior.
Restaurant Inspection_fitted.jpeg

Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

Related stories from Bradenton Herald

Ryan Ballogg covers arts, entertainment, dining, breaking and local news for the Bradenton Herald. He has won awards for feature writing and environmental writing in the Florida Press Club’s Excellence in Journalism Competition. Ryan is a Florida native and graduated from University of South Florida St. Petersburg.
Support my work with a digital subscription
SUBSCRIBE TODAY
  Comments