Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Bare hands on food, flies and more problems at Bradenton-area restaurants

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report of Manatee County, several restaurants are having issues maintaining proper handwashing and food contact practices.

Improper handwashing among food workers can lead to the spread of Hepatitis A; Florida is currently experiencing a major outbreak of the disease.

Several other Bradenton-area restaurants were cited for storing food at unsafe temperatures.

Keke’s Breakfast Cafe, 11633 S.R. 70, Bradenton

  • Coffee filters were not stored protected from contamination. Corrective action was taken.
  • Employee drink and food were kept in a dry food storage area, creating the possibility for cross-contamination. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee cell phone was kept on a food preparation table. The phone was removed.
  • An inspector observed a cook touch a bare body area with a gloved hand and then fail to wash hands and change gloves. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee handwash sink was not accessible because of a pitcher stored inside.
  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.

Scarpino’s Family Restaurant, 6152 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • Raw fish was stored over ready-to-eat, cooked chicken. Corrective action was taken.
  • A warewashing machine was dirty.
  • Warewashing sanitizing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed. Corrective action was taken.
  • No test kit was at hand to measure the strength of sanitizer in use for warewashing.

  • An open container of milk was not properly date-marked. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee with an ineffective hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.
  • There was no proof of required training for two employees hired more than 60 days prior.
  • A wet wiping cloth was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses. Corrective action was taken.

  • An employee was touching ready-to-eat food with bare hands.
  • Marinara was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • A spray bottle containing a toxic substance was not labeled. Corrective action was taken.

BEHIND OUR REPORTING

Why did we report this story?

Each week, the Bradenton Herald reviews data of restaurants that have been recently inspected in Manatee County. Local public health departments regularly inspect businesses serving food to ensure restaurants and other food retail outlets are following safe food handling procedures.

Crager’s Restaurant, 7218 N. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota

  • A container of food was stored on the floor of a walk-in cooler.
  • The ceiling was dirty.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.
  • The lid of a grease receptacle was left open.
  • Food was being thawed in standing water at a handwash sink.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were pitted with rust and soiled with encrusted food debris.
  • A wet wiping cloth was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed.
  • An inspector observed a dishwasher handle soiled dishes and then handle clean dishes without first washing hands.
  • Butter was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees.
  • Chili and sliced carrots were hot held at temperatures less than 135 degrees.
  • Raw eggs were held at an ambient temperature of more than 45 degrees.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of food-borne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • One manager’s food manager certification was expired. Another manager lacked proof of food manager certification.
  • A handwash sink could not be properly used because a bucket of water, colander and thawing meat were placed in it.

  • A spray bottle containing a toxic substance was not labeled.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

Esplanade Golf and Country Club, 12825 Malachite Dr., Lakewood Ranch

  • An inspector observed four flying insects in food preparation areas.
  • A bartender was observed touching fresh mint and limes with bare hands. An inspector educated the employee on proper procedures.
  • Tomatoes, raw beef, vegetable stock, clam chowder, sour cream, conch chowder, chicken stock, shredded cheese, pepper jack cheese, feta cheese, cheddar cheese, provolone cheese, Swiss cheese, kale, lettuce, ham, turkey, vegan burgers, potato soup and buttermilk were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. The foods had been held at unsafe temperatures for more than four overs or overnight. A stop sale was issued for all of the foods.
  • An employee used a handwash sink as a dump sink. An inspector educated the employee on proper use of handwash sinks.
  • In-use tongs were stored on an equipment door handle in between uses. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee purse was stored with potato chips.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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