Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Live roaches, insect larvae prompt shutdown of Bradenton steakhouse

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report of Manatee County, Samurai Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Bar in Bradenton was temporarily shut down after insect larvae and live roaches were observed on site.

Other citations at Bradenton-area restaurants included food temperature control issues and unclean surfaces.

Here’s what inspectors found:

Samurai Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Bar, 3611 First St., # 110, Bradenton

  • An inspector ordered that Samurai Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Bar be temporarily shut down on Aug. 2 after live insects were found in the establishment.
  • An inspector observed nine live roaches.
  • An inspector observed approximately 100 insect larvae under a dishwashing machine.
  • Sticky tape for catching flies was hanging over a food preparation area.
  • Raw salmon was stored over pasta in a walk-in freezer. The pasta was relocated.
  • Chemicals were stored with food on the cook line.
  • Medicine was stored with food on the cook line. An employee moved the medicine.
  • A bucket of dried shrimp was stored on the floor of a walk-in freezer. A manager shelved it.
  • A cutting board on the cook line had cut marks and was no longer cleanable.
  • There was grease accumulated under cooking equipment, on walls and on the cook line.
  • Raw shrimp was thawing at room temperature. The inspector educated a manager regarding proper thawing techniques, and the shrimp was moved to a reach-in cooler for thawing.
  • Cut vegetables were stored in reused boxes in a walk-in cooler. Corrective action was taken.
  • Surfaces in a walk-in cooler were soiled, according to an inspector.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade. An employee cleaned it.
  • The restaurant passed a follow-up inspection on Aug. 3 and was allowed to reopen.

Evie’s Tavern and Grill, 5897 Whitfield Ave., Sarasota

  • The ceiling was dirty.
  • Two pizzas were being held at room temperature the front counter, and the time that they had been removed from temperature control could not be determined. A cheese pizza that measured at 86 degrees was discarded.
  • Single service items were not stored protected from contamination.
  • An open container of milk was not properly date-marked.
  • Buffalo chicken dip that was prepared on site was not properly date-marked.
  • There was standing or slow-draining water in a handwash sink on the cook line.
  • There were no handwashing signs provided at three sinks used by food employees.
  • Wet wiping cloths were not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade.
  • The food manager’s certification was expired.
  • No currently certified food manager was on duty while four or more employees were preparing or handling food.
  • No test kit was provided to measure the strength of sanitizer in use for warewashing.
  • A food thermometer at the wait station was not accurate.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution was not a t the proper minimum strength.

Scoops Ice Cream, 1144 Whitfield Ave., Sarasota

  • A wet wiping cloth was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses.
  • Warewashing sanitizing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • The restaurant operator was not properly tracking the amount of time that food was held at refrigeration temperature before being frozen to be reused later.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

Eleni’s Pizza Works, 6711 15th St. E., Sarasota

  • Meatballs were hot held at less than 135 degrees on the cook line.
  • An inspector observed approximately 13 flying insects in dry storage areas, including around bagged onions.

  • Cut roast beef, sliced turkey, provolone cheese, feta cheese and diced tomatoes were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. The foods were iced down.
  • Raw animal foods in a walk-in cooler were not properly separated from one another based upon minimum required cooking temperature.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.

  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.

  • Food was stored on the floor in a dry storage area. Corrective action was taken.
  • Reach-in cooler shelves used for pizza preparation were soiled, according to an inspector.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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