Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Inspectors find roaches, mold, more issues at Bradenton fast-food joints

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

During the most recent inspection of Manatee County restaurants, several Bradenton fast-food joints were cited for unsanitary conditions.

One restaurant had live roaches on site, and another had mold growing in an ice machine.

Here’s what inspectors found:

McDonald’s, 5315 Cortez Road W., Bradenton (inside Walmart)

  • An inspector observed two live roaches in the restaurant. Both roaches were killed and discarded.
  • A floor area in the kitchen was covered with standing water.
  • Degreasing chemicals were stored by ice cream crumbles at the front counter. The chemicals were moved.

Domino’s Pizza, 909 First St. E., Bradenton

  • A food employee’s visor was not properly restraining hair, according to an inspector.
  • A prep cook was not wearing a beard guard over his beard.
  • Paper plates were stored unprotected under the register counter. Corrective action was taken.
  • A wet wiping cloth used on a prep counter was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses. Corrective action was taken.

  • A chemical was stored near food on a storage rack. Corrective action was taken.
  • Warewashing sanitizing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed. Corrective action was taken.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed. Corrective action was taken.
  • A handwash sink was not accessible for employee use due to an ice bucket stored inside. Corrective action was taken.
  • There was no proof of required training for an employee hired more than 60 days prior.
  • A spray bottle containing a toxic substance was not labeled.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

KFC, 525 First St. E., Bradenton

  • There was an accumulation of black mold-like substance in the interior of an ice machine.
  • The ice chute on a self-service drink machine was soiled with mold-like substance/slime.
  • A handwash sink near the drive-through window was blocked by an iced tea machine. Corrective action was taken.
  • Warewashing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed. Corrective action was taken.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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