Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Slime, insects, raw fish among issues plaguing Bradenton-area eateries

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report of Manatee County, several restaurants are having issues keeping equipment and surfaces clean.

Other citations at Bradenton-area restaurants included flies in the kitchen and meat that was held at room temperature.

Salem’s Gyros and Subs, 5605 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton

  • The floor was soiled in multiple areas of the restaurant.
  • An employee drink was on the cook line. It was moved to a designated area.
  • A jug of oil was stored on the floor. An employee moved it.
  • A table where meats were dredged was soiled.
  • Shrimp on the cook line was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees. A cook iced it down for rapid cooling.
  • There was no written procedure in place for the use of time as a public health control to monitor potentially hazardous food. An inspector observed cooked meats at ambient temperature on the cook line.

Pinchers, 10707 Rodeo Dr., Lakewood Ranch

  • An inspector observed five live flying insects in the kitchen.
  • A cook who was changing tasks did not wash hands before putting on new gloves, according to an inspector.
  • Raw shrimp was stored over cooked corn in a reach-in cooler, and raw fish was stored over ready-to-eat clams in a walk-in cooler.
  • The interior of an ice bin in the kitchen was soiled with black/green mold-like substance.
  • The gaskets in a seafood display case had a slimy/mold-like buildup.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution was not at the proper minimum strength. Corrective action was taken.
  • A cutting board had cut marks and was no longer cleanable.

Chili’s Grill and Bar, 6125 Exchange Way, Bradenton

  • Cooked pasta, tomatoes, shredded cheese, butter, avocado, sliced cheese, lettuce, brisket, sausage, turkey and pork stored in reach-in coolers were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. A stop sale was issued for all of the foods.
  • Reach-in coolers were not working properly.
  • There was an accumulation of debris on a dish machine.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation. Corrective action was taken.
  • The floor of a walk-in freezer was soiled.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

Sea Hut Restaurant, 5611 U.S. 19, Palmetto

  • Crab meat was being thawed at room temperature. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee drink was stored on a food prep table. Corrective action was taken.
  • No handwashing sign was provided at a sink used by food employees.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed. Corrective action was taken.

Peach’s Restaurant, 5702 Cortez Road W., Bradenton

  • Bug spray was stored on a food preparation table. It was moved to a designated area.
  • A bucket was blocking access to a handwash sink. It was relocated.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade. It was cleaned.
  • Employee drinks were stored in food storage areas. The drinks were moved to a designated area.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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