Food & Drink

Dirty dining: This pizza joint had pesky patrons. Inspectors shut down the restaurant

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspections report of Manatee County, Fratello’s Chicago Pizzeria in Bradenton was temporarily shut down when an inspector found signs of rodent activity on site.

Other Bradenton-area restaurants were cited for issues including storing meats at unsafe temperatures and bare hand contact with food.

Here’s what inspectors found:

Fratello’s Chicago Pizzeria, 7110 Cortez Road W., Bradenton

  • An inspector ordered that Fratello’s Chicago Pizzeria in Bradenton be temporarily shut down on July 15 after observing signs of rodent activity.
  • An inspector observed approximately 86 rodent droppings throughout the establishment, including under dining booths and under the pizza oven. Employees swept and vacuumed up the droppings and discarded them.
  • Rodent nesting materials were found under the padded seats of two dining booths and under a long bench.
  • Rodent rub marks were visible on a 12-person bench frame, according to an inspector. Hair and food debris were accumulated around the padded seat.
  • In-use utensils were stored in unclean water at room temperature. Corrective action was taken.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade. An employee cleaned it.
  • Required employee training was expired for one employee.
  • A soda gun at the bar was soiled.
  • The restaurant passed a follow-up inspection on July 16 and was allowed to reopen.

Michelangelo’s Pizzeria and Italian Restaurant, 2957 University Parkway, Sarasota

  • An inspector observed an employee handle sliced provolone cheese with bare hands.
  • Pizza sauce, mozzarella, ricotta, blue cheese and cut leafy greens were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • Hot water at a handwash sink did not reach 100 degrees.
  • There was no probe thermometer at hand to measure the temperature of food products.
  • The establishment was operating with an expired Division of Hotels and Restaurants license.

  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.
  • Single service articles were improperly stored. Corrective action was taken.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were encrusted with food debris.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

Pizza Hut, 4802 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • There was an accumulation of debris on a warewashing machine.
  • The ceiling was dirty.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were soiled with encrusted food debris.
  • A wall in the dishwashing area was soiled with accumulated black debris.
  • Walls were soiled throughout the kitchen.
  • Beef sausage and pork sausage were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.

  • No soap was provided at a handwash sink in a food prep area.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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