Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Inspectors shut down popular waterfront restaurant for second time in a month

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report of Manatee County, Sea Hut Restaurant in Palmetto was shut down when an inspector found signs of rodent and insect activity.

Several other Bradenton-area restaurants were cited for storing potentially hazardous foods at unsafe temperatures.

Sea Hut, 5611 U.S. 19, Palmetto

  • An inspector ordered that Sea Hut be temporarily shut down on June 20 after finding signs of rodent activity, insect larvae and flying insects inside the establishment. The restaurant had also been temporarily shut down on May 23. That time, an inspector found signs of rodent and roach activity.
  • An inspector observed approximately 40 rodent droppings on the floor near an ice machine, walk-in freezer, shelves and single-service items.
  • An inspector observed six larvae-like insects in standing water in a cooler in a salad preparation area.
  • An inspector observed approximately 14 flies around a bar storage area and three small flying insects around a garbage can in the salad prep area.
  • There was an objectionable odor throughout the back kitchen area, according to an inspector.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were rusted.
  • Crab soup, bacon dressing, crab dip, cooked shrimp and lobster bisque were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. A chef discarded the foods.
  • An inspector observed fried frog legs being sent out with an internal temperature of less than 145 degrees. A chef instructed the fry cook to reheat the frog legs to a higher temperature.
  • Shellfish tags were not marked with the last date the food was served.
  • No currently certified food service manager was no duty while four or more employees were engaged in food preparation or handling.
  • A walk-in cooler was not maintaining a cool enough temperature.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.
  • There was a gap along the bottom of an exterior door that opened to the outside.
  • There was standing water on the floor in a hallway next to a walk-in freezer.
  • The restaurant was allowed to reopen after a follow-up visit on June 21. Another follow-up inspection was required.

Taqueria Morales, 5645 15th St. E., Bradenton

  • An inspector observed approximately four flying insects in the kitchen.

  • Shredded mozzarella cheese, yellow rice and cooked mushrooms were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.

  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.

  • No test kit was at hand to measure the strength of sanitizer in use for warewashing.

  • The ceiling was soiled with accumulated food debris, grease or mold-like substance.

  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.

  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

Burger King, 3235 University Parkway, Sarasota

  • Vanilla dairy mixture in an ice cream hopper was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees.
  • Sliced tomatoes and shredded lettuce on the make line were in use for longer than the four-hour time limit. The foods were discarded.
  • It was unclear when grilled chicken and spicy chicken on the make line had been removed from temperature control. Time stamps were assessed.
  • Th ice chute on a self-service drink machine had a buildup of mold-like substance/slime.
  • A manager lacked proof of food manager certification.
  • There was no proof of required training for four employees hired more than 60 days prior.
  • An employee with an ineffective hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.

Dom’s Deli, 2119 63rd Ave. E., Bradenton

  • An employee was observed handling sausage biscuits, cooked roast beef, lettuce, hamburger buns and sliced tomatoes with bare hands.

  • Coleslaw was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees. The coleslaw was moved for rapid cooling.

  • Raw eggs were stored at an ambient air temperature greater than 45 degrees.

  • Wiping cloth sanitizer solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed.

  • The ceiling was soiled.

  • A wall was soiled with accumulated food debris. grease and/or dust.

  • A cutting board had cut marks and was no longer cleanable.

  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.

  • There was no handwashing sin provided at a sink used by food employees.

  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.

  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade.

  • There was no probe thermometer at hand to measure the temperature of food products.

  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.

  • Coleslaw, cooked onions and roast beef in a reach-in cooler had no date-marking.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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