Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Inspectors shut down waterfront restaurant because of roaches, rodent droppings

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report of Manatee County, a Palmetto waterfront restaurant was temporarily shut down when an inspector observed more than 100 rodent droppings on site.

A handful of Bradenton-area restaurants were cited for improperly storing raw foods.

The Sea Hut, 5611 U.S. 19, Palmetto

  • The Sea Hut in Palmetto was temporarily closed on May 23 when an inspector observed signs of rodent activity on site.
  • An inspector observed approximately 127 rodent droppings throughout the restaurant, including on a sugar bin, on a storage shelf, under a dish storage area and on top of and behind an oven.
  • An inspector observed approximately nine dead roaches throughout the establishment.
  • An inspector observed multiple holes in the walls throughout the kitchen, as well as walls that were buckling outward.
  • Food was stored on the floor of a walk-in cooler.
  • In-use tongs were stored on an equipment handle between uses.
  • A walk-in cooler had unsealed wooden walls.
  • There was an objectionable odor at multiple areas of the restaurant, according to an inspector.
  • Multiple servers were observed handling plated food with bare hands.
  • Grouper, yellow rice, hot dogs and rice and vegetables were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • A chemical sanitizer test kit was expired.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade.
  • During a follow-up visit on May 24, an inspector observed approximately four dead roaches and approximately 55 rodent droppings. The restaurant remained closed.
  • The restaurant met inspection standards during a follow-up visit on May 25 and was allowed to reopen.

Jason’s Deli, 5231 University Parkway # 101, University Park

  • Sliced turkey, sliced ham, chicken breast and hard boiled eggs were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • Multiple pasta salads were not being cooled fast enough. A restaurant operator moved the pastas to a colder cooler.
  • A manager’s food manager certification was expired.
  • Required employee training was expired for one employee.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.
  • Reach-in cooler shelves were pitted with rust.
  • The floor of a walk-in cooler was soiled.

China Taste, 8421 Tuttle Ave., Sarasota

  • An inspector observed a whisk and pan get washed without sanitizing and then returned to use. A restaurant operator sanitized the dishes.
  • Rice noodles were soaking in water at room temperature. The pasta was placed in a walk-in cooler.
  • Raw beef was stored over cooked egg rolls and cooked pork in a reach-in cooler. The beef was moved to a bottom shelf.
  • Raw eggs were being stored at room temperature.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses or symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • An employee used a handwash sink as a dump sink.
  • Hot water at a restroom handwash sink did not reach 100 degrees.
  • A bag of onions and cases of chicken were stored on the floor. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.
  • Single-service articles were improperly stored. Corrective action was taken.
  • A wet wiping cloth was not store in sanitizing solution in between uses. Corrective action was taken.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution was not at the proper minimum strength. Corrective action action was taken.
  • The ceiling was soiled.

Eat Here, 5315 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach

  • Most of the foods in a walk in cooler were held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. The foods observed at potentially unsafe temperatures were blue cheese, beef ribs, beef drippings, sour cream, aioli, shredded cheese, raw chicken, goat cheese, cream cheese, American cheese, Muenster cheese, heavy cream, gravy, raw salmon, cooked potatoes, cooked chicken, cooked pork, cooked shrimp and pot roast. A stop sale was issued for several of the items.
  • On the cook line, raw shrimp, raw grouper, raw salmon and raw mahi mahi were being held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. An inspector educated an employee regarding proper cold holding techniques, and the foods were iced down.
  • Butter was being held at room temperature.
  • Required employee training was expired for some employees.

Restaurant Edelweiss, 611 Manatee Ave. E., Bradenton

  • The restaurant was using hydrogen peroxide, an unapproved sanitizer, to clean food contact surfaces. Corrective action was taken.
  • Cooked sausage, cooked beef, raw pork, provolone cheese and Swiss cheese were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. The foods were moved to coolers.
  • Cooked meat was stored with raw sausages. The cooked meat was relocated.
  • Butter and cooked potatoes were being held at room temperature. Corrective action was taken.
  • A jug of oil was stored on the floor. The jug was shelved.
  • An employee drink was stored on the cook line. It was removed.
  • Single-use aluminum pans were not stored protected from contamination. Corrective action was taken.
  • A wall in the dishwashing area was soiled with accumulated black debris.

Thai Wasabi, 5250 State Road 64 E., Bradenton

  • Korean barbecue fish, cooked shrimp, tuna and salmon at a sushi bar were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. An inpector instructed an employee to ice down all of the food and to consider turning down the temperature at the unit.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade. It was cleaned.
  • No soap was provided at a handwash sink on the cook line. Corrective action was taken.
  • Vegetables were stored in non-food-grade bags. The vegetables were moved to food-grade containers.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

The Farm House, 902 Manatee Ave. E., Bradenton

  • Raw eggs were stored over American cheese and deli meat. The eggs were moved to a bottom shelf.
  • Raw/undercooked animal foods were offered at the establishment without a written consumer advisory. Corrective action was taken.
  • A scoop handle was touching doughnut mix. The handle was moved.

The Angry Rooster Wing Company, 7230 52nd Place E., Bradenton

  • Pork, cooked mushrooms, ricotta cheese and shredded cheddar and mozzarella were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • Raw foods were not properly separated based upon minimum required cooking temperature. Raw chicken was stored directly over raw shrimp in a reach-in cooler. Corrective action was taken.
  • There was an accumulation of black mold-like substance inside of an ice machine.
  • Open milk was not properly date-marked.
  • An employee used a handwash sink as a dump sink, according to an inspector.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade.
  • A manager lacked proof of food manager certification.
  • Required training was expired for all employees.
  • The ceiling was soiled throughout the kitchen.
  • A wet wiping cloth was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee handled dirty dishes or utensils and then clean dishes or utensils without first washing hands. Corrective action was taken.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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