Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Roaches crawling the walls cause temporary closure of Bradenton restaurant

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
Up Next
Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report of Manatee County restaurants, Willy-Yums in Bradenton was temporarily shut down when an inspector observed multiple roaches on site.

Other restaurants were cited for failing to cool potentially hazardous foods from room temperature fast enough.

Willy-Yums, 2003 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • Willy-Yums was temporarily closed on May 2 after an inspector found signs of roach activity on site.
  • An inspector observed seven live roaches throughout the establishment, including three crawling on a wall near a food preparation area and three on a wall near warewashing and handwashing sinks. A restaurant operator killed and discarded the roaches.
  • A box of chips was stored on the kitchen floor. The box was shelved.
  • Single service containers and napkins were stored in an employee bathroom. The items were removed.
  • An employee drink was stored on a food preparation table. The drink was removed.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed.
  • There was an accumulation of grease on a hotdog cooker and holding unit. The unit was cleaned.
  • A handwash sink was not accessible for employee use due to a dish drain stored inside. The dish drain was discarded.
  • There was no test kit at hand for measuring the strength of sanitizer used for wiping cloths.
  • Willy-Yums passed a follow-up inspection on May 3 and was allowed to reopen.

Poppo’s Taqueria, 8471 Cooper Creek Blvd, Bradenton

  • Pico de gallo and guacamole in a walk-in cooler had not been cooled from room temperature to at least 41 degrees within four hours. The foods were discarded.
  • There was not proof of required training for an employee hired more than 60 days prior.
  • Tomato sauce that was prepared on site was not properly date-marked. Corrective action was taken.

Fresh Kitchen, 8491 Cooper Creek Blvd #101, Bradenton

  • Black bean and tomato salsa and kale pesto and tomato salsa in a walk-in cooler had not been cooled from room temperature to at least 41 degrees within four hours.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illness and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • There was no proof of required training for two employees hired more than 60 days prior.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

Dunkin Donuts, 4415 34th St. W., Bradenton

  • An employee book bag was stored in a dry storage area. The bag was relocated.
  • An ice scoop’s handle was in direct contact with drink ice. Corrective action was taken.
  • Single service cups were stored on the floor. The cups were shelved.
  • Cooked sausage was hot held at a temperature less than 135 degrees. The inspector instructed the restaurant operator to reheat the sausage.

  • Hot water in both restrooms did not reach 100 degrees.

Restaurant Inspection_fitted.jpeg

Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

Related stories from Bradenton Herald

  Comments