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Sheriff says they are not done fighting against opioids 0:59

Sheriff says they are not done fighting against opioids

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Arizona high school dance team wows internet with 'Wizard of Oz' performance

  • New efforts to stop America's opioid abuse problem

    A growing number of law and health care agencies are working to make naloxone (Narcan), available without a prescription. The drug is used to treat an opioid emergency, such as an overdose or a possible overdose of a prescription painkiller or, more commonly, heroin. Mayo Clinic addiction specialist Dr. Jon Ebbert says the new nasal form of naloxone makes it easier to administer than the injectable version.

A growing number of law and health care agencies are working to make naloxone (Narcan), available without a prescription. The drug is used to treat an opioid emergency, such as an overdose or a possible overdose of a prescription painkiller or, more commonly, heroin. Mayo Clinic addiction specialist Dr. Jon Ebbert says the new nasal form of naloxone makes it easier to administer than the injectable version. The Mayo Clinic News Network
A growing number of law and health care agencies are working to make naloxone (Narcan), available without a prescription. The drug is used to treat an opioid emergency, such as an overdose or a possible overdose of a prescription painkiller or, more commonly, heroin. Mayo Clinic addiction specialist Dr. Jon Ebbert says the new nasal form of naloxone makes it easier to administer than the injectable version. The Mayo Clinic News Network

Recent heroin spike raises alarms

July 18, 2016 5:34 PM

More Videos

Sheriff says they are not done fighting against opioids 0:59

Sheriff says they are not done fighting against opioids

Dark clouds didn't chase away Bayfest crowds 0:31

Dark clouds didn't chase away Bayfest crowds

'Everybody's history is important' says Confederate group 1:17

'Everybody's history is important' says Confederate group

Debris dumping is hurting nearby businesses 0:36

Debris dumping is hurting nearby businesses

Village of the Arts honors Snooty 1:26

Village of the Arts honors Snooty

Lake Okeechobee levels begin to drop after Hurricane Irma 1:59

Lake Okeechobee levels begin to drop after Hurricane Irma

Third fatal shooting in 10 days prompting concern in Florida neighborhood 1:24

Third fatal shooting in 10 days prompting concern in Florida neighborhood

New York's Close to Home program: a less harsh approach to reforming delinquents 2:39

New York's Close to Home program: a less harsh approach to reforming delinquents

What the expansion at Motorworks Brewery means for customers 0:56

What the expansion at Motorworks Brewery means for customers

Arizona high school dance team wows internet with 'Wizard of Oz' performance 7:20

Arizona high school dance team wows internet with 'Wizard of Oz' performance

  • Mother fights for changes after death of son to opioids

    Cindy Dodds 24-year-old son, Kyle, was found dead of a lethal drug overdose on the streets of Overtown in Sept. 2016. Kyle had a mix of fentanyl, carfentanil, cocaine and heroin in his system. Cindy is hoping to raise awareness about opioid abuse, and that lawmakers strengthen the Florida law punishing dealers who give out fatal doses of the drugs.