Business

Dirty dining: Raw meat, foul odors and more issues at these Bradenton-area restaurants

According to the latest inspection report of Manatee County restaurants, several establishments are having problems with employee handwashing.

A handful of restaurants were cited for storing food and drink on the floor, and one fast food spot had foul odors emanating from the restroom area.

Burger King, 8502 State Road 70 E., Bradenton

  • The handwashing sink in the men’s restroom was soiled, and there was liquid all around a toilet and sink and on the wall. according to an inspector.
  • The inspector also noted that a foul, objectionable odor was present inside the restroom and noticeable outside of it.
  • Chicken tenders and chicken breast were stored on the floor of a walk-in freezer. A manager shelved the items.
  • There was no handwashing sign at a sink used by food employees. A manager made a sign and posted it.
  • Plumbing was disconnected under a handwashing sink.
  • An inspector observed liquid and a discarded glove on the floor of a walk-in cooler. On the floor of a walk-in freezer, an inspector observed torn bags of chicken nuggets, loose onion rings, a piece of veggie burger, raw beef patty and tater tots. An employee removed the food debris and mopped the area.
  • Water was draining from a handwash sink onto the floor on the cook line.
  • Handwash sinks in the men’s and women’s restrooms lost pressure when toilets were flushed.

  • Hot water at handwash sinks in both restrooms did not reach 100 degrees. A manager reset the system.
  • A handwash sink was not accessible for employee use due to a wiping towel stored inside. A manager removed the towel.

Rico’s Pizzeria & Pasta House, 5218 State Road 64, Bradenton

  • The ceiling was soiled with accumulated dust.
  • Bottled water was stored on the floor. Corrective action was taken.
  • At least one in use knife was stored between cracks in pieces of equipment.
  • In-use tongs were stored on an equipment door handle between uses.
  • No handwashing signs were provided at multiple sinks used by food employees.
  • An inspector observed a restaurant operator using a dry wiping cloth to wipe their nose. The cloth was then left on a kitchen counter.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were encrusted with food debris.
  • A cook was observed handling cooked bread with bare hands.
  • Shredded meat balls, meatballs and sliced ham were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. During a follow-up inspection a week later, shredded mozzarella cheese, marinara, cut sausage, sliced ham, meatballs and ricotta cheese were observed cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • Raw chicken was stored directly over mozzarella cheese in a walk-in cooler.
  • A certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • The restaurant’s certified food manager was unable to answer basic food code questions about proper dishwashing procedures and holding requirements for potentially hazardous foods.
  • A cook was observed washing hands in a non-handwashing sink.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade.
  • The hot water at a handwash sink on the cook line did not reach 100 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • No soap was provided at a handwash sink on the cook line.
  • The ice chute of a self-service drink machine was so lied with a buildup of mold-like substance/slime.
  • No test kit was at hand to measure the strength of sanitizer in use at a three-compartment sink/warewashing machine.
  • There was no proof of required training for an employee hired more than 60 days prior.
  • A probe thermometer was not accurate.

Happy Dragon, 11161 State Road 70 #102, Lakewood Ranch

  • Boxes of shrimp were stored in a bucket on the floor of a walk-in cooler, according to an inspector. An employee moved the food to a shelf.
  • An employee drink was on a food preparation table. The drink was removed.
  • Floors in the kitchen and bathroom were soiled.
  • Food was being stored in non-food-grade bags in a reach-in freezer.
  • Egg rolls and cooked chicken were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. An employee moved the items to a walk-in cooler.
  • A handwash sink was not accessible for employee use due to towels stored inside. Corrective action was taken.
  • There was no proof of required training for an employee hired more than 60 days prior.
  • None of the ready-to-eat foods that were prepared and held on site for more than 24 hours were properly date-marked, according to an inspector.

Truman’s Tap & Grill, 11161 State Road 70 E., #100, Lakewood Ranch

  • Containers of chicken and pickles were stored on the floor of a walk-in cooler. Corrective action was taken.

  • The wall and ceiling of a beer keg cooler were soiled with accumulated debris and/or dust.
  • Dishmachine sanitizer was not at the proper minimum strength.
  • Deli meat was stored in a box with unwashed mushrooms. The meat was removed.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade. The blade was cleaned.
  • There was no proof of required training for an employee hired more than 60 days ago.
  • Coleslaw and cut lettuce were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken. During a follow-up inspection, the same two food items were again being held at unsafe temperatures.

River Club Grille, 6600 River Club Blvd., Bradenton

  • A box of potatoes was stored on the floor in a dry storage area. Corrective action was taken.
  • Cooked beef, buns and boxes of food were stored on the floor of a walk-in freezer. An employee shelved the items.
  • An employee drink and phone were stored in the warewashing area. Corrective action was taken.
  • In-use tongs were stored on an equipment door handle in between uses. An employee removed them.
  • A soda gun and a soda gun holster were soiled. Both were cleaned.
  • Warewashing sanitizer was not at the proper minimum strength. Corrective action was taken.
  • An inspector observed several instances of raw animal food stored over ready-to-eat food. Raw eggs were stored over raw pork and produce, raw beef was stored with cooked beef and raw shrimp was stored over cheese and hot dogs.
  • Soda tubes were stored in drink ice at the bar. A stop sale was issued on the ice and the manager determined to dispense ice from a food grade bus tub.
  • An employee used a handwash sink as a dump sink, dumping brown liquid into the sink. Corrective action was taken.
  • An inspector observed an employee use a handwash sink to fill a pitcher. Corrective action was taken.
  • There was not test kit at hand to measure the strength of sanitizer in use for wiping cloths.
  • Coleslaw and cut melon that had been held overnight were not date-marked.

3 Keys Brewing & Eatery, 2505 Manatee Ave. E., Bradenton

  • Raw beef, bread and ice were stored on the floor of a walk-in freezer. An employee shelved the items. Boxes of chips were stored on the floor in an office. The boxes were shelved.
  • Plastic plates were stored on the floor. An employee shelved the plates.
  • Dishmachine sanitizer was not at the proper minimum strength.
  • American cheese was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees. The cheese was discarded.
  • In a walk-in freezer, raw beef and chicken were stored with pureed watermelon and over raw shrimp and bread. Employees reorganized the freezer so that ready-to-eat food was stored above and separate from raw food.

  • An inspector observed cooked chicken and beef in a walk-in cooler that were date-marked as more than a week old.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade. The blade was cleaned.
  • An employee drink was stored on a food preparation table. The drink was removed.
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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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