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Dirty dining: Bugs (gross), reused butter (really gross) and more at these restaurants

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspections report, several Manatee County restaurants had issues safely storing food.

Two Bradenton restaurants were cited for having insects on site.

Eliza Ann’s Coastal Kitchen, 5325 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach

  • Ready-to-eat soups were stored under unwashed tomatoes and lettuce in a walk-in cooler. An employee moved the items to a separate storage area.
  • Two soda guns at the bar were soiled. An employee cleaned the soda guns.
  • Cream cheese was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees. An inspector instructed a cook to rapid cool the cream cheese.
  • Ready-to-eat soup was stored in a container of live oysters, according to an inspector. Corrective action was taken.
  • Oyster tags were not marked with the last date that the oysters had been served. An inspector educated an employee regarding proper date-marking of labels.
  • Warewashing sanitizing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed. Corrective action was taken.
  • A handwash sink on the cook line was not accessible for employee use due to an item stored inside. Corrective action was taken.
  • Hot water at handwash sinks used by employees did not reach 100 degrees.
  • There was no test kit at hand to measure the strength of sanitizer in use at a three-compartment sink/warewashing machine.

Courtyard by Marriott Bradenton Sarasota Riverfront, 100 Riverfront Dr., Bradenton

  • An inspector observed six flying insects throughout the establishment. During a follow-up visit, three flying insects were observed.
  • Clam/mussel/oyster tags were not marked with the last date the shellfish was served. An inspector educated a manager about proper date-marking.
  • A handwash sink was no accessible for employee use due to silverware and a scratch pad stored inside. Corrective action was taken.
  • Single service articles were stored on the floor in a dry storage area. Corrective action was taken.

Bon Appetit, 3300 First St., Bradenton

  • An inspector observed one dead roach on the floor near a kitchen exit.
  • Chicken gravy, raw fish, cut raw beef and cheddar cheese were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • Brown rice and white rice at a steam table were hot held at temperatures less than 135 degrees. The food was discarded.
  • Ceiling vents in the kitchen were soiled with accumulated dust.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • There was no certified food manager on duty while four or more employees were engaged in food preparation or handling.
  • The establishment was operating without a license from the Division of Hotels and Restaurants.
  • Containers of cooking oil were stored on the floor. A restaurant operator elevated the oil.
  • Hot water was not provided at at any employee handwash sinks.
  • The interior of a reach-in freezer had exposed insulation.
  • Single service articles were not stored protected from contamination. A restaurant operator discarded the items.
  • A wall behind a steam table was soiled with accumulated grease and food debris.

Holly’s Quarter Cup Cafe, 5911 53rd Ave. E., Bradenton

  • Food was being re-served to customers, an inspector said. Restaurant staff collected unused butter from tables and stored it in a bin for future use. The inspector advised the restaurant operator to refrain from reusing potentially hazardous food items that were stored at room temperature. The butter was discarded.
  • A server handled soiled dishes and then picked up plated food/served food/prepared a beverage without first washing hands.
  • There was a buildup of grease on walls and shelves at the cook line.
  • There was a buildup of food debris around a flat top grill.
  • Coffee filters were not stored protected from contamination.
  • An inspector observed an approximately 10 inch hole in a wall at the cook line.
  • The wall at the cook line was soiled with accumulated grease and food debris.
  • Wet wiping cloths at the front counter were not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses.

Don Beto Jaimes Restaurant, 6320 15th St. E., Sarasota

  • An employee touched ready-to-eat, cooked tortillas with bare hands.
  • An employee was observed washing hands with no soap.
  • An employee washed hands in a sink other than an approved handwash sink.
  • Sanitizer for manual warewashing was not at the proper minimum strength.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • There was no probe thermometer at hand to measure the temperature of food products.
  • There was no tes kit at hand to measure the strength of sanitizer in use at a three-compartment sink/warewashing machine.
  • Ceiling vents were soiled with accumulated dust.
  • In-use tongs were stored on an equipment door handle in between uses.
  • An unprotected ice machine was located in a customer dining area.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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Ryan Ballogg covers arts, entertainment, dining, breaking and local news for the Bradenton Herald. He won first place for feature writing in the Florida Press Club’s 2018 Excellence in Journalism Competition. Ryan is a Florida native and graduated from University of South Florida St. Petersburg.

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