Business

More dirty dining: Bradenton-area restaurants cited for roaches, mold, other issues

According to the latest inspections report of Manatee County restaurants, multiple establishments had mold-like substances on walls or equipment.

Other Bradenton-area restaurants were cited for storing raw food over ready-to-eat food.

Golden Wok, 5917 Manatee Ave. W., Unit 601, Bradenton

  • An inspector observed one dead roach near a handwash sink in the cooking area. Corrective action was taken.

  • There was an accumulation of food debris/soil residue on a handwash sink near the cook line.

  • A cutting board on the cook line had cut marks and was no longer cleanable.

  • An employee had mussels and raw fish stored in a walk-cooler with customer food a raw fish stored in two freezers with customer food. Corrective action was taken.

  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation. Corrective action was taken.

  • The floor was soiled in the cook line area and there was food on the floor throughout the kitchen and prep area, according to an inspector.

  • Spices on the bottom shelf of a prep table were not covered. Corrective action was taken.

  • Food was stored on the floor in a walk-in cooler and prep area.

  • An in-use utensil was not stored on a clean surface. Corrective action was taken.

  • Food was found stored in non-food-grade bags in horizontal freezers.

  • An inspector observed two packages of raw chicken that were left to thaw at room temperature. Corrective action was taken.

  • Single-service aluminum pan were not stored protected from contamination.

  • Food items stored in a walk-in cooler, walk-in freezer and reach-in freezer were not covered. Corrective action was taken.

  • Multiple walls were soiled, and a wall in the walk-in cooler had a large area of mold-like substance.

  • A wet wiping cloth was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses.

  • Raw fish was stored over milk, raw chicken was stored over cabbage and unwashed potatoes were stored over cooked shrimp in a walk-in cooler.

  • A toxic substance was stored by or with food at a prep table. Corrective action was taken.

  • Lo mein noodles and chicken were left on a storage rack to cool at room temperature. Corrective action was taken.

  • All of the food items in a walk-in cooler were not date marked after 24 hours in use.

1000 Degrees Pizza, 6220 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • During a follow-up inspection, foods that had been prepared or opened more than a week before were again observed. A stop sale was issued for diced tomatoes stored in a reach-in cooler and in a walk-in cooler.

Attardi’s Pizzeria, 7286 55th Ave. E., Bradenton

  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.

  • Salt and cooking oil were stored on the floor.

  • Reach-in cooler shelves were pitted with rust.

  • In-use knives and spatulas were stored in cracks between pieces of equipment. Corrective action was taken.

  • There was no handwash sign at a sink used by food employees.

  • Paper plates at the front counter were not stored protected from contamination.

  • The wall behind a steam table was soiled with accumulated food debris.

  • Ziti pasta in a reach-in cooler had not been cooled from 135 degrees to 41 degrees within 6 hours. A stop sale was issued.

  • Cheese pizza, meatballs and marinara were hot held at temperatures less than 135 degrees.

  • Raw eggs were stored directly over mozzarella cheese in a reach-in cooler. Corrective action was taken.

  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.

  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade.

  • A handwash sink was not accessible for employee use due to items stored in the sink.

  • Hot water was not provided at an employee handwash sink in a restroom.

  • There was no test kit on hand to measure the strength of sanitizer in use at a three-compartment sink/warewashing machine.

  • The restaurant had no probe thermometer to measure the temperature of food products.

  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.

  • The restaurant was using cooking equipment that produced grease-laden vapors/smoke with no hood suppression system installed.

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Perkins Restaurant, 6023 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • During a follow-up inspection, an inspector again observed improper handwashing procedure. A cook was observed changing gloves after handling dirty dishes without first washing hands.

The Preserve Golf Club, 7310 Tara Preserve Lane, Bradenton

  • There was an accumulation of black/green mold-like substance inside an ice bin.

  • Coffee filters were not stored protected from contamination.

  • The floor in a dry storage area was soiled.

  • Boxes of beverages were stored on the floor in a dry storage area.

  • The wall of a dry storage room was soiled with accumulated food debris.

  • A wet wiping cloth in use at the bar was stored in sanitizing solution in between uses.

  • Provolone cheese, sliced ham and sliced turkey were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.

  • Raw eggs were stored directly above mixed leafy greens in a reach-in cooler.

  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.

  • The establishment had no certified food manager.

  • Sliced ham, sliced turkey and milk were not properly date-marked after opening.

  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade.

  • A handwash sink was not accessible for employee use. A sign read: “Do not use. Drain not working,” according to an inspector.

  • No soap was provided at handwash sinks at the wait station and at the bar.

  • There was no test kit at hand to measure the strength of sanitizer at a three-compartment sink/warewashing machine.

  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.

  • Chicken noodle soup that was prepared on site and held for more than 24 hours was not properly date-marked.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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