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Dirty Dining: Rat droppings at buffet and more citations at Bradenton-area restaurants

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2016-17

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2016-17 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2016-17 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspections report of Manatee County restaurants, a Palmetto buffet was cited on two occasions after rat droppings were observed on the premises.

Meanwhile, a Bradenton pizza restaurant was cited for dirty walls and floors and moldy equipment.

King Buffet, 1429 Eighth Ave., Palmetto

  • An inspector observed approximately 30 dry and hard rodent droppings on the floor in a dry storage room. Corrective action was taken. During a follow-up inspection, an inspector observed approximately 10 dry and hard rodent droppings on the floor behind an ice machine. Corrective action was taken.
  • There was an accumulation of black/green mold-like substance in the interior of an ice machine.
  • Food was stored on the floor. Corrective action was taken.
  • There was no handwashing sign at a sink used by employees.
  • Beef was observed thawing at room temperature.
  • Single service article were not stored protected from contamination.
  • Walk-in cooler/freezer shelves were pitted with rust.
  • Dishmachine sanitizer was not at the proper minimum strength. Corrective action was taken.
  • Self-serve ice cream on a buffet line was not protected from contamination.
  • In-use sushi rice with no means of temperature control was hot held at a temperature less than 135 degrees. A stop sale was issued.
  • Raw chicken wings were stored directly above ready-to-eat fried chicken.
  • Clam/mussel/oyster tags were not marked with the last date the food was served. The restaurant was not maintaining clam/mussel/oyster tags for 90 days, according to an inspector.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade.
  • An inspector observed chicken cooling at room temperature.
  • A probe thermometer was not accurate.

Pizza Hut, 4802 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • The floor was soiled in multiple locations.
  • A container of cooking oil and bottles of water were stored on the floor. Corrective action was taken.
  • Gaskets on a reach-in cooler on the cook line had a mold-like buildup.
  • An inspector observed an approximately 10-foot stretch of wall in the dining room that was damaged due to an automobile collision.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were soiled with food debris.
  • Walls at a dish washing area, a preparation area and near a three-compartment sink were soiled with accumulated grease, food debris and/or dust.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illness and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution was not at the proper minimum strength.
  • A handwash sink in the warewashing area was not accessible for employee use. Corrective action was taken.
  • An ice chute on a self-service drink machine was soiled with mold-like substance/slime.
  • The interior of a reach-in cooler was soiled with an accumulation of food residue. Corrective action was taken.
  • A probe thermometer at the restaurant was not accurate. Corrective action was taken.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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