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More dirty dining: Bradenton-area restaurants cited for mold, dirty hands

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2016-17

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2016-17 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2016-17 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspections report of Manatee County restaurants, multiple establishments are not storing food at safe temperatures.

Several restaurants also were cited for dirty ice machines and soda dispensers.

Robin’s Downtown Cafe, 428 12th St. W., Bradenton

  • A box of food was stored on the floor in a hallway.
  • An employee loaded dirty dishes and then unloaded clean dishes without washing hands.
  • Employee items were stored in areas where food was stored or prepared, including a phone and drinks in a food preparation area and a vape pen in a dry storage area.
  • A line cook had no hair restraint and a dishwasher had no beard guard, according to an inspector.
  • Gaskets at a reach-in cooler had a slimy mold-like buildup.
  • A temperature gauge on a dishwashing machine was not operational.
  • Wet wiping cloths used for occasional spills were not clean.
  • Raw beef, deli meat, cooked chicken, cooked ham, raw eggs, cooked eggs and pasta were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • There was an accumulation of black/green mold-like substance behind soda dispensing nozzles in the wait area.
  • The bottom of a reach-in cooler was soiled at the cook prep station and a fan blade at a reach-in cooler in a dry storage area had a mold-like substance on it.

Pupuseria Y Taqueria Cristelle, 5507 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • Sliced turkey was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illness and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • Open milk and sliced turkey were not date marked.
  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.
  • There was no thermometer at hand for measuring temperatures below 50 degrees.

Hooters, 4908 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • An in-use ice scoop was stored on a soiled surface between uses. Corrective action was taken.
  • There was lime scale buildup inside of an ice machine. Corrective action was taken.
  • Vents on the cook line were soiled with accumulated food debris, grease and dust.
  • The floor of a walk-in freezer was soiled.
  • Dishmachine sanitizer was not at the proper minimum strength, according to an inspector.
  • Raw chicken wings were cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees.
  • An inspector observed garlic butter prepared more than a week prior in a reach-in cooler. The food was discarded.

Peach’s Restaurant, 6057 26 St. W., Bradenton

  • Walk-in cooler shelves were soiled with encrusted food debris and were pitted with rust.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizer was not at the proper minimum strength.
  • Cantaloupe, sausage links, sausage patties, hard boiled eggs, beef in gravy, pooled eggs, quiche, Canadian bacon and marinara were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken. During a follow-up visit, an inspector observed sausage patties, sausage links and pooled eggs cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • There was no proof of required training for an employee hired more than 60 days before.
  • The restaurant’s probe thermometer was not accurate.

Burger King, 5224 15th St. E., Bradenton

  • Vanilla dairy mixture was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee was wearing jewelery other than a plan ring while preparing food. Corrective action was taken.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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