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Dirty Dining: Three Bradenton-area McDonald’s cited by inspectors in one day

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2016-17

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2016-17 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2016-17 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report, three Bradenton-area McDonald’s locations were cited by health inspectors in one day.

Common themes were dirty hands and employee handwash sinks with no hot water.

McDonald’s 11050 S.R. 64 E., Bradenton

  • An inspector observed an accumulation of mold-like substance on the nozzles of a cream dispenser and frappe machine. Corrective action was taken.
  • A handwash sink in the dish room was not accessible for employee use. Corrective action was taken.
  • Hot water was not provided at an employee handwash sink. Corrective action was taken.
  • Ice buckets were stored on the floor in between uses. Corrective action was taken.

McDonald’s, 6103 U.S. 301, Ellenton

  • An inspector observed an employee wipe counters and doors and then put on gloves without first washing hands. Another employee was observed working with raw food and then changing gloves without washing hands.
  • There was a fly in the food preparation area.
  • A stop sale was issued for breaded chicken that was not time marked and measured at a temperature of 125 degrees.
  • An ice scoop handle was in contact with ice at the ice machine.
  • Eggs on the cook line had cracks or broken shells.
  • A spray bottle containing a toxic substance was placed on a food preparation area. Corrective action was taken.

McDonald’s, 604 67th St. Circle E., Bradenton

  • An inspector observed an employee change gloves without first washing hands. Corrective action was taken.
  • Hot water was not provided at employee handwash sinks in the men’s and women’s restroom. A manager called a plumber to fix the issue.
  • There was an objectionable odor in the women’s restroom, an inspector said. A manager called a plumber to fix the issue.
  • A reach in freezer was soiled.
  • A spray bottle containing a toxic substance was not labeled.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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