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Dirty Dining: Bradenton-area restaurants cited for flying insects, dirty kitchens

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2016-17

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2016-17 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2016-17 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report, multiple Bradenton-area restaurants were cited for unsafe food temperatures.

A handful of restaurants were also cited for failing to properly date-mark open and ready-to-eat food.

Taqueria Mi Reina, 1880 63rd Ave. E., Bradenton (food truck)

  • An inspector observed approximately 10 small flying insects in the food truck.
  • Chorizo and mozzarella were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illness and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • An employee was touching ready to eat food with bare hands.
  • A handwash sink was not accessible for employee use.
  • Hot water was not provided at an employee handwash sink.

China Gourmet, 4278 53rd Ave. E. Unit 3, Bradenton

  • An in-use rice scoop was stored in standing water at less than 135 degrees.
  • A wet wiping cloth was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses.
  • An inspector observed an employee improperly sanitize part of a rice cooker using only soap and water.
  • Lo mein, peas and carrots, bean sprouts, cooked diced pork and raw eggs were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.

  • An inspector observed raw chicken stored over cooked pork.
  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.
  • An inspector observed chicken wings and yellow rice left at room temperature to cool without any temperature control.

The Island Spice, 3608 E. Bay Drive, Holmes Beach

  • An employee with no hair restraint or beard guard was engaging in food preparation.
  • There was an accumulation of food debris or grease inside on fan ice machine and on a can opener.
  • Hot water was not provided at an employee handwash sink.
  • Food held for more than 24 hours was not properly date marked.
  • A spray bottle containing a toxic substance was stored on the cook line.

The Ranch Grille at Legacy Golf Club, 8255 Legacy Blvd., Lakewood Ranch

  • There was an accumulation of black/green mold-like substance in the interior of the ice machine, according to an inspector.
  • Wet wiping cloths used for occasional spills were not clean.
  • A spray bottle containing a toxic substance was not labeled.
  • Tongs were stored on an oven door handle in between uses.
  • A cook had no hair restraint while engaging in food preparation.

Haydee’s Coffee and Bakery, 5803 15th St. E. Unit 3, Bradenton

  • The kitchen ceiling was soiled with accumulated food debris, grease, dust or mold-like substance.
  • An inspector observed a box of cabbage stored on the floor.
  • An inspector observed meat thawing at room temperature. Corrective action was taken.
  • Cooked sliced steak was cooling at room temperature with no temperature control.
  • Dishes were improperly washed using a soap mixture containing bleach.
  • Queso and sausage were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • Raw eggs were cold held at a temperature greater than 45 degrees.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illness and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • The restaurant’s probe thermometer was not accurate.

Mami Carmen’s Restaurant, 5604 15th St. E., Bradenton

  • There was an accumulation of black/green mold-like substance in the ice machine at the front counter.
  • Chicken noodle soup, beef soup, cabbage soup, diced tomatoes, shredded mozzarella and cooked beef were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • Milk and mozzarella were open and had no date marking.
  • Cooked pork, bins of cooked rice, cooked yuca and cooked chicken in a reach in cooler were also not date-marked.

  • The restaurant’s food manager’s certification was expired.
  • Reach-in cooler shelves were rusty.
  • A wall was soiled with accumulated black debris in a dishwashing area.
  • A wet wiping cloth was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses.
  • The restaurant had no probe thermometer for measuring temperatures below 50 degrees.

Mulligans, 5526 E. 15th St., Bradenton

  • Food was stored on the floor of a walk-in cooler/freezer.
  • Single service articles were not protected from contamination.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were rusty, according to an inspector.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illness and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • Milk was not properly date marked.
  • There was no test kit on hand to measure the strength of chlorine sanitizer.
  • A soda gun was soiled.

Bigg Dogg BBQ LLC, 6132 15th St. E., Bradenton

  • An inspector observed one dead roach under a three compartment sink.
  • An employee was engaged in food preparation with no hair restraint.
  • Required employee training was provided by an unapproved provider.

Pollos Asados La Frontera (food truck), 1100 Eighth Ave. W., Palmetto

  • The truck was operating with no potable running water including at the handwashing sink and three compartment sink. An inspector observed an employee fill a bowl with water at a faucet about 20 feet from the truck. The facility was temporarily closed and reopened later that day after the issue was resolved.
  • Rice was being hot held with no temperature control at a temperature greater than 135 degrees.
  • A bag of onions was stored on the floor.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizer solution exceeded the maximim concentration allowed.
  • There was no soap at the handwash sink.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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