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Dirty dining: Mold and dirty hands are issues for these Manatee restaurants, inspectors say

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations

Routine, unannounced restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. These are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2015-16 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Routine, unannounced restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. These are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2015-16 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

A handful of Manatee County restaurants have been cited by Florida restaurant inspectors for build ups of mold-like substance and employee failure to properly wash their hands.

Other violations included temperature issues and certification.

Buffalo Creek Golf Course, 8100 Erie Road, Palmetto

  • A stop sale was issued on hot dogs and brats that were hot held at temperatures lower than 135 degrees, according to an inspector.
  • An inspector observed an accumulation of black/green mold-like substance in the interior of the ice machine and black/gray mold in a prep sink.
  • Hot dogs, deli meat and sliced cheese that were opened more than 24 hours ago had not been properly date marked.
  • Ready-to-eat tuna, chicken and egg salad that was prepared at the restaurant had not been properly date marked within 24 hours.

Hungry Howie’s, 5912 18th St. E., Ellenton

  • A stop sale was issued on pasta salad, cheese, ham and other foods that were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees, according to an inspector.
  • An inspector observed an accumulation of black/green mold-like substance on soda dispensing nozzles.
  • The ice chute on the drink machine had a build up of mold-like substance.
  • Proof of required state-approved training was not available for some employees.

Super 8, 5218 17th St. E., Ellenton

  • An inspector said an employee used a soiled towel to dry their hands.
  • An employee was observed pushing down trash in a garbage can and then proceeding to handle equipment at the buffet without washing their hands, according to an inspector. The issue was corrected.
  • The handwash sink was not accessible due to items stored inside of it and employees were seen washing their hands at a different sink, an inspector said.
  • The manager lacked proof of food manager certification.
  • There was no proof of required state-approved employee training for some employees.

New Chung Shing, 8951 N. U.S. Highway 301, Parrish

  • An inspector observed cooked chicken being cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. The issue was corrected.
  • There was no proof of required state-approved training for any employees.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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