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Dirty dining: Bradenton barbecue restaurant shut down after inspectors find 130 roaches

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations

Routine, unannounced restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. These are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2015-16 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Routine, unannounced restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. These are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2015-16 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

A Bradenton barbecue restaurant remains closed after a July 25 inspection revealed the presence of dozens of roaches.

Inspectors found a total of 130 roaches in four subsequent follow-up inspections. Finger Lickin’ BBQ remained shut down as of Tuesday night.

Finger Lickin’ BBQ Bar & Grill, 3142 53rd Ave. E., Bradenton

  • An inspector shut down Finger Lickin’ BBQ after discovering evidence of roach activity, mold and other health violations.
  • An inspector discovered 37 dead roaches, including one in the microwave and 10 at the cook line. The operator discarded of some of the roaches. Another 70 dead roaches were observed during four subsequent inspections.
  • Thirteen live roaches were observed in the restaurant. An operator attempted to kill them but could only discard of some of them. Ten more live roaches were observed during four subsequent inspections.
  • Roach excrement that was “too numerous to count” covered a plastic wrap box, an inspector said. the operator threw the box away.
  • Pot stickers in a cooler were observed with mold-like growth, according to an inspector.
  • A certified food manager lacked knowledge of foodborne illness and symptoms that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • There was no consumer advisory on the menu for raw/undercooked animal foods, an inspector.
  • None of the food in a walk-in cooler contained a date marking.
  • Employee training has expired for all employees and one employee did not have proof of training after they were hired more than 60 days ago.
  • A spray bottle containing toxic substance was not labeled, according to an inspector.
  • Finger Lickin’ BBQ was temporarily shut down on July 25 and remained closed by inspector order at the time of publication.

Burger King, 8502 State Road 70 E., Bradenton

  • Liquid eggs, cooked chicken, raw bacon and other foods were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees, according to an inspector. The issue was corrected.
  • An inspector observed an accumulation of black/green mold-like substance in the interior of the ice machine. Corrective action was taken.
  • Both probe thermometers on-site contained batteries. The issue was corrected.

Katie’s Cafe, 3130 53rd Ave. E., Bradenton

  • Cut watermelon, sliced tomatoes, cut honeydew melon were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees, according to an inspector. Corrective action was taken.
  • Oatmeal was hot held at a temperature lower than 135 degrees, according to an inspector. Corrective action was taken.

Big Cow Creamery 5217 33rd St. E., Bradenton

  • Milk was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees, according to an inspector. The issue was corrected.
  • A certified food manager lacked knowledge of foodborne illness and which symptoms would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • There was no probe thermometer to measure food temperature.

P&L Seafood, 3020 15th St. E., Bradenton

  • Cooked corn was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees, according to an inspector. Corrective action was taken.

Little Caesar’s Pizza, 8428 Lockwood Ridge Road, Sarasota

  • According to an inspector, an employee failed to wash their hands before changing or putting on gloves. The issue was corrected.
  • The ambient air thermometer was not accurate within 3 degrees.

Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to re-open, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed via this link.
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