Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Bare hands, food on floor and more issues at Bradenton-area restaurants

During the most recent inspections of Manatee County, multiple restaurants had issues with proper employee handwashing.

Several businesses were cited for violations requiring a follow-up inspection.

Here’s what inspectors found.

Fiona’s Family Restaurant, 5207 33rd St. E., Bradenton

  • An employee was observed washing gloved hands without soap. The single-use gloves should have been changed, according to an inspector.
  • Cut cantaloupe, butter, tuna salad and tzatziki sauce were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • Raw pork was stored over ready-to-eat casserole and raw eggs were stored over salad dressing in a walk-in cooler. Corrective action was taken.
  • The restaurant was operating without a license from the Division of Hotels and Restaurants.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • Chili and gravy in a walk-in cooler were not date-marked.
  • There was standing water on the kitchen floor when a dishmachine was in use, according to an inspector.
  • A wet wiping cloth was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses.
  • A probe thermometer used for measuring food temperatures was not accurate.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade.
  • A container of food was stored on the floor in the kitchen.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

Marina’s Pizza, 1723 Lakewood Ranch Blvd., Bradenton

  • Sandwich meat, chicken, cheese, cut tomatoes and cut lettuce were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. A stop sale was issued for all of the foods due to temperature abuse.
  • The interior of an ice machine was soiled, according to an inspector.
  • There was an accumulation of encrusted food debris on/around a mixer head.
  • There was encrusted material on a can opener blade. The can opener was replaced.
  • A handwash sink was not accessible for employee use. Corrective action was taken.
  • Pizza dough and produce were stored on the floor of a walk-in cooler or freezer, and pizza sauce was stored on the kitchen floor.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

Solo’s Pizza, 3244 E. Bay Dr., Holmes Beach

  • An employee was observed preparing a salad with bare hands. The employee discarded the salad.
  • Shredded cheese and cut tomatoes were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade.
  • Required training was expired for two employees.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

The Waterfront Restaurant, 111 S. Bay Blvd., Anna Maria

  • Butter was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees on the cook line. Corrective action was taken.
  • Raw shell eggs were stored over milk in a walk-in cooler. Corrective action was taken.
  • Required employee training was expired for one employee.
  • A floor area was covered with standing water.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

McDonald’s, 7185 State Road 70 E., Bradenton

  • Warewashing sanitizing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed.
  • A chart needed to check sanitizer levels was not available.
  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were soiled with encrusted food debris.
  • An employee with an ineffective hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

Chung Shing, 8951 U.S. 301 N., Parrish

  • Wontons, breaded chicken and rice were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • Raw chicken was stored over raw beef in a reach-in freezer. The foods were reorganized.
  • Egg rolls, noodles, cooked chicken and rangoons that had been prepared on site were not properly date-marked.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were pitted with rust.
  • A non-food-grade bag was used to wrap meat in a freezer. The manager changed the bag. No food-grade equipment was being used to mix food in the kitchen, according to an inspector.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation. Corrective action was taken.
  • Soy sauce containers, a box of soup crackers and a box of chicken were stored on the floor.

  • An employee washed hands in a non-handwash sink.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

Old Hamburg Schnitzelhaus, 3246 E. Bay Dr., Holmes Beach

  • Milk was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees. An employee discarded it.
  • Egg was was being held at room temperature. An employee discarded it.
  • An inspector observed multiple employees washing hands with a sprayer by the dish machine. The inspector instructed them to only wash hands using a handwash sink.
  • Proof of required training was not available for one employee.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

J. Burns’ Pizza, 308 Pine Ave., Anna Maria

  • Warewashing sanitizing solution in use at the restaurant did not meet requirements, according to an inspector. The manager discontinued use of peroxide solution for sanitizing food-contact surfaces.
  • Required training was expired for one employee.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

BEHIND OUR REPORTING

Why did we report this story?

Each week, the Bradenton Herald reviews data of restaurants that have been recently inspected in Manatee County. Local public health departments regularly inspect businesses serving food to ensure restaurants and other food retail outlets are following safe food handling procedures.

Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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Ryan Ballogg covers arts, entertainment, dining, breaking and local news for the Bradenton Herald. He has won awards for feature writing and environmental writing in the Florida Press Club’s Excellence in Journalism Competition. Ryan is a Florida native and graduated from University of South Florida St. Petersburg.
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