Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Inspectors find grime, unsafe temperatures, more issues at fast-food spots

During the most recent inspections of Manatee County, several fast food restaurants were cited for storing food at unsafe temperatures.

Others were failing to maintain clean equipment and surfaces as well as proper employee training.

Here’s what inspectors found.

Steak ‘n Shake, 106 Cortez Road W., Bradenton

  • Dishmachine sanitizer was not at the proper minimum strength.
  • Sliced tomatoes, diced tomatoes, spaghetti, corn dogs, macaroni and cheese and breaded chicken were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • The food manager’s certification was expired.
  • No currently certified food manager was on duty while four or more employees were engaged in food preparation or handling.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

McDonald’s, 6225 State Road 64 E., Bradenton

  • Butter was being held at room temperature. An employee moved it to refrigeration.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.

  • There was no test kit at hand to measure the strength of sanitizer in use for warewashing.

  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.

  • A follow-up inspection was required.

Culver’s, 4714 State Road 64 E., Bradenton

  • Butter and sour cream were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • Cooked onions were hot held at a temperature less than 135 degrees.
  • A wet wiping cloth was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses.
  • A chemical test kit used to ensure proper sanitization of equipment was expired.
  • A spray bottle containing a toxic substance was not labeled.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

McDonald’s, 2911 53rd Ave. E., Bradenton

  • Butter, multiple quantities of sliced ham, pooled eggs, raw shell eggs, sliced tomatoes and shredded lettuce were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • There was no proof of required training for multiple employees hired more than 60 days prior.
  • Cooking oil was stored on the floor.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

Newk’s Eatery, 5405 University Parkway #110, Bradenton

  • Coleslaw and pasta salad were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. The items were moved to a freezer for rapid cooling.
  • An employee handwash sink was blocked by a garbage can.

  • Hot water at a sink in the men’s restroom did not reach 100 degrees.
  • There was a limescale buildup inside of a dishmachine.
  • The establishment was operating with an expired Division of Hotels and Restaurants license.
  • A follow-up inspection was required.

BEHIND OUR REPORTING

Why did we report this story?

Each week, the Bradenton Herald reviews data of restaurants that have been recently inspected in Manatee County. Local public health departments regularly inspect businesses serving food to ensure restaurants and other food retail outlets are following safe food handling procedures.

Burger King, 551 10th St. E., Palmetto

  • Raw bacon was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees as it sat on a prep cart on the cook line. The meat was moved to a reach-in cooler.

  • The interior of an oven had a heavy accumulation of black substance, grease and/or food debris.

  • Floor drain covers were heavily soiled in a self-service area in the dining area.

  • The restaurant met inspection standards.

Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

Related stories from Bradenton Herald

Ryan Ballogg covers arts, entertainment, dining, breaking and local news for the Bradenton Herald. He has won awards for feature writing and environmental writing in the Florida Press Club’s Excellence in Journalism Competition. Ryan is a Florida native and graduated from University of South Florida St. Petersburg.
Support my work with a digital subscription
SUBSCRIBE TODAY
  Comments