Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Roaches, other insects, improperly stored food found at Bradenton-area restaurants

During the most recent inspections of Manatee County restaurants, several establishments were cited for having dead or live insects on site.

Other restaurants had issues including lack of employee handwashing and failing to protect single-use items from contamination.

Here’s what inspectors found.

Subway, 508 10th St. E., Palmetto (inside Walmart Supercenter)

  • An inspector observed 15 to 20 flying insects in the rear area of the kitchen.
  • An inspector observed an employee change gloves without washing hands. The employee was then educated on proper handwashing procedure.
  • Coffee filters were stored unprotected from contamination. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee with no hair constraint was engaged in food preparation. Corrective action was taken.
  • An open employee beverage was stored with food to be served to customers in a walk-in cooler. The drink was removed.

Papa John’s, 5838 State Road 70, Bradenton

  • An inspector observed one dead roach in a box storage area. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee with an ineffective hair restraint was engaged in food preparation. Corrective action was taken.
  • Steak was being cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees.
  • Sanitizer in use for warewashing was not at the proper minimum strength.
  • All of the test strips in a sanitizer test kit were expired.

  • Hot water was not provided at an employee handwash sink on the make line.
  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.

Wheat + Water Italian Kitchen, 7303 52nd Place E., Bradenton

  • The ceiling was soiled.
  • In-use utensils at the wait station and cook line were stored in standing water at less than 135 degrees.
  • No handwashing signs were provided at two handwash sinks used by food employees.
  • Steak, raw chicken breast and risotto were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. An inspector advised icing down the foods. During a follow-up inspection, goat cheese, cooked artichokes, raw sausage links, cooked onions and cooked rice were being cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. An inspector advised icing down the foods or relocating them to a unit capable of maintaining the proper temperature. A restaurant operator iced down the food.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • Milk in a walk-in cooler was not properly date-marked.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can-opener blade. Corrective action was taken.
  • A handwash sink on the cook line was not accessible due to items stored inside.
  • Hot water was not provided at a handwash sink at the bar.
  • Soap was not provided at a handwash sink at the bar.
  • Eggplant Parmesan that was prepared on site was not properly date-marked.

BEHIND OUR REPORTING

Why did we report this story?

Each week, the Bradenton Herald reviews data of restaurants that have been recently inspected in Manatee County. Local public health departments regularly inspect businesses serving food to ensure restaurants and other food retail outlets are following safe food handling procedures.

Joey D’s Chicago Style Eatery and Pizzeria, 945 10th St. E., Palmetto

  • An employee was observed touching a soiled surface and then engaging in food preparation without washing hands. An inspector educated the restaurant operator on proper procedure.
  • A wet wiping cloth was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation. Corrective action was taken.
  • Clean silverware was not stored protected from contamination.

China One, 5627 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • Pork, breaded boneless chicken, raw chicken, raw shrimp, raw beef, cream cheese and dumplings were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. A restaurant operator lowered the temperature in the cold holding units.
  • Rice was stored at room temperature. Corrective action was taken.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution was not at the proper minimum strength. Corrective action was taken.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation. Corrective action was taken.
  • Cooking oil was stored on the floor. Corrective action was taken.
  • A spray bottle containing a toxic substance was not labeled.

Cafe Amalfi, 6703 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • Single service articles were stored unprotected from contamination, according to an inspector.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation. Corrective action was taken.
  • In a reach-in cooler, an inspector observed sliced ham and sliced turkey that had been open or prepared more than a week prior. A stop sale was issued. Open sausage in a reach-in cooler was not properly date-marked. Corrective action was taken.
  • Hot water was not provided at an employee handwash sink at a wait station.
  • No soap was provided at an employee handwash sink near a dishmachine.
  • Meat sauces held at refrigeration temperature and then frozen for future use were not being properly date-marked, according to an inspector. Corrective action was taken.
  • Two reach-in coolers had shelves soiled with food debris.
  • Diced chicken and marinara sauce that were prepared on site were not properly date-marked.

Smoqehouse, 1701 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach

  • All of the potentially hazardous food items in a walk-in cooler were being held at improper temperatures. Leafy greens, raw beef, raw chicken, cooked chicken, cooked beef, cooked pork, cooked potatoes, Cuban sandwiches and cheese measured at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. A stop sale was issued for all of the foods.
  • Cooked chicken and raw beef were being cold held on the cook line at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. The food were iced down.
  • Cloth towels were being used to keep tortillas moist.
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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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Ryan Ballogg covers arts, entertainment, dining, breaking and local news for the Bradenton Herald. He has won awards for feature writing and environmental writing in the Florida Press Club’s Excellence in Journalism Competition. Ryan is a Florida native and graduated from University of South Florida St. Petersburg.
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