Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Bradenton restaurant shut down after inspector finds rodent droppings

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspections report of Manatee County, Acapulco Restaurant in Bradenton was temporarily shut down after rodent activity was observed on site.

Other local restaurants were cited for issues including dirty equipment and surfaces and holding food at unsafe temperatures.

Here’s what inspectors found:

Acapulco Restaurant, 1833 Lakewood Ranch Blvd., Bradenton

  • An inspector ordered that Acapulco Restaurant in Bradenton be shut down on Aug. 20 after observing signs of rodent activity on site.
  • An inspector observed 15-20 rodent droppings under a slicer table next to a reach-in freezer.
  • Raw fish was thawing at room temperature in a three-compartment sink.
  • Ground beef and shredded chicken had not been cooled from 135 degrees to 41 degrees withing six hours, the meats were stored in pans stacked on top of one another, the meats were cooled at a quantity deeper than four inches and they were covered while cooling. A stop sale was issued.
  • Raw eggs were stored over raw corn in a cooler.
  • Steel wool and a container were stored inside an employee handwash sink, rendering it unusable.
  • An employee was observed making bare hand contact with a lemon for iced tea.
  • Employee drinks were stored on a food prep table. The drinks were removed.
  • Cooking oil was stored on the floor.
  • A spray bottle containing a toxic substance was not labeled.

Michelangelo Pizza, 11517 Palmbrush Trail, Bradenton

  • Ground meat, cooked peppers, marinara and sausage were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. A stop sale was issued for all of the foods.
  • Raw eggs were stored over tomatoes. The eggs were removed.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed. Corrective action was taken.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade.
  • A slicer blade was soiled with old food debris.
  • A trash can was blocking access to an employee handwash sink.
  • No soap was provided at a handwash sink.
  • There was a heavy buildup of debris inside a convection oven, according to an inspector.
  • There was an accumulation of debris on a warewashing machine.
  • Cases of food were stored on a walk-in cooler floor.
  • An employee cell phone was stored on a food preparation area on the cook line.
  • An inspector observed grease that had accumulated under the cook line.
  • A spray bottle containing a toxic substance was not labeled. Corrective action was taken.

BEHIND OUR REPORTING

Why did we report this story?

Each week, the Bradenton Herald reviews data of restaurants that have been recently inspected in Manatee County. Local public health departments regularly inspect businesses serving food to ensure restaurants and other food retail outlets are following safe food handling procedures.

Cody’s Original Roadhouse, 895 Cortez Rd. W., Bradenton

  • The ceiling was dirty.
  • Coffee filters were not stored protected from contamination.
  • The main walk-in cooler and a walk-in cooler used to hold meat had shelves with rust that had pitted the surface.
  • The floor of a walk-in freezer was soiled.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution was not at the proper minimum strength.
  • Cut tomatoes, sliced tomatoes, diced tomatoes, shredded cheese, shredded lettuce, half and half and ice cream mix were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • Mashed potatoes were hot held at a temperature less than 135 degrees. The same issue was observed during a follow-up inspection three days later.
  • A rare roast was not being held at 130 degrees or above. A restaurant operator moved the roast to an oven. The same issue was observed during a follow-up inspection three days later.
  • A food probe thermometer was not accurate.

Duffy’s Sports Grill, 3005 University Parkway, Sarasota

  • Coffee filters were not stored protected from contamination. Corrective action was taken.
  • No handwashing sign was provided at a sink used by food employees. Corrective action was taken.
  • The floor of a walk-in freezer was soiled.
  • A wall behind the cook line was soiled with accumulated grease, food debris and/or dust.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution was not at the proper minimum strength because a dishmachine was not functioning properly. A restaurant operator set up a manual dishwashing station.
  • A dishwasher was observed handling soiled dishes and then clean dishes without first washing hands.
  • Comminuted beef patties, sauerkraut and hot dogs were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • There was no proof of required training for two employees hired more than 60 days prior.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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