Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Roaches shut down Bradenton fast-food joint. A beach restaurant had bugs, too

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report of Manatee County, a McDonald’s location in Bradenton was temporarily shut down after an inspector observed live and dead roaches on site.

A beach restaurant was also cited for having live and dead roaches and flying insects on site.

Here’s what inspectors found:

McDonald’s, 5315 Cortez Rd. W., Bradenton

  • An inspector ordered that McDonald’s inside a Walmart store be temporarily shut down on July 2 after observing live and dead roaches on site.
  • An inspector observed two dead roaches on site. The roaches were discarded.
  • An inspector observed seven live roaches throughout the restaurant. The roaches were killed and discarded.
  • A drain cover was missing at the mop sink. A manager put the cover back on.
  • A handwash sink was not accessible for employee use due to a cup stored inside. An employee removed it.
  • Hot water was not provided at an employee handwash sink. A manager turned on the hot water.

  • The restaurant met inspection standards during a follow-up visit on July 3 and was allowed to reopen.

The Ugly Grouper, 5704 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach

  • An inspector observed one live roach on the wall at the end of the cook line.
  • An inspector observed one dead roach on a prep table shelf at the end of the cook line.
  • An inspector observed approximately 30 flying insects in the kitchen area and 12 in an outdoor bar area.
  • An inspector observed five glue traps for flies hanging throughout the kitchen.
  • An ice scoop was stored on a soiled mat.
  • Employees without effective hair restraints were engaged in food preparation.
  • Bags of flour were left uncovered under a prep table, and cucumbers were uncovered in a walk-in cooler.
  • No handwashing sign was provided at a sink used by food employees at the bar.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution was not at the proper minimum strength.
  • Employees were observed grabbing lemons and fruit for drink garnishes with bare hands while the establishment was under a foodborne illness investigation. (A case of Hepatitis A was confirmed in one of the restaurant’s food service workers on July 1.)
  • A cook was observed dropping pans on the floor and then picking them up without any handwashing. An inspector educated the employee on proper handwashing, and the employee washed hands and put on new gloves.
  • An employee switched from preparing raw food to ready-to-eat food without washing hands. An employee at the fry station was observed touching raw fish, then touching a service plate and then putting salad mix onto a plate. The employee was instructed to discard the plate, take off gloves and wash hands.
  • An employee at the bar used a towel to wipe hands and the bar and tables. An inspector educated the employee on proper sanitization and handwashing.
  • Cut tomatoes, shredded cheese, cooked chicken, raw grouper, raw shrimp and raw chicken were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Some foods were iced down and others were moved to a cooler for rapid cooling.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed. Corrective action was taken.
  • A handwash sink was not accessible for employee use due to being blocked by a garbage can.
  • No test kit was at hand to measure the strength of sanitizer in use for warewashing.
  • There was no probe thermometer at hand to measure the temperature of food products.

  • A box of food was stored on the floor in a walk-in freezer, and two buckets of food were stored on the floor of a walk-in cooler. A manager shelved the items.

Blue Marlin Seafood, 121 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach

  • Two cooks with beards were not wearing beard guards, according to an inspector.
  • The floor in a warewashing area was covered with standing water.
  • Water was building up in a handwash sink in the kitchen.
  • No handwashing sign was provided at a sink used by food employees. A sign was posted.
  • Butter, mousse, pasta, blue cheese, raw beef, raw shrimp, raw grouper, cut tomatoes and egg wash were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. An inspector educated a restaurant operator regarding the rapid cooling of food, and the food was iced down.
  • An employee was observed using a handwash sink as a dump sink. Corrective action was taken.
  • A handwash sink was not accessible for employee use due to torches stored inside. The torches were removed.
  • A walk-in cooler was leaking from seams in the ceiling, and water water was covering the floor.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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Ryan Ballogg covers arts, entertainment, dining, breaking and local news for the Bradenton Herald. He won first place for feature writing in the Florida Press Club’s 2018 Excellence in Journalism Competition. Ryan is a Florida native and graduated from University of South Florida St. Petersburg.
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