Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Rodent droppings cause temporary shutdown of Palmetto restaurant

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

In the latest inspector’s report, 25 rodent droppings caused the closure of the New King Buffet in Palmetto last week.

Other restaurants were cited for insect issues.

New King Buffet, 1429 Eighth Ave. W., Palmetto

  • Inspectors ordered New King Buffet to temporarily close on June 5 when rodent droppings were observed in the kitchen.
  • According to an inspector’s report, 25 rodent droppings were observed.
  • An employee was seen working with food without washing their hands first.
  • Chicken wings and coleslaw were not being held at the proper temperatures.
  • New King Buffet met inspection standards on June 6 and was allowed to reopen.

Checker’s, 5220 15th St. E., Bradenton

  • An inspector said there were five flying insects in the restaurant’s kitchen. An inspector said there were three more flying insects in the kitchen during a follow-up visit.
  • Raw beef, hot dogs and sliced tomatoes were not being held at the proper temperature.
  • An employee was seen washing their hands with cold water. The issue was corrected.

Chung Shing, 8951 U.S. 301 N., Parrish

  • One dead roach was observed beneath the hand washing sink.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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