Food & Drink

More dirty dining: Inspectors shut down Palmetto restaurant because of rodent droppings

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report of Manatee County, a Palmetto restaurant was temporarily shut down when an inspector observed a large amount of rodent droppings on site.

A Bradenton restaurant was cited for having dead roaches.

Demi’s Noodle House, 1318 10th St. W., Palmetto

  • The restaurant was temporarily shut down on May 16 after an inspector observed signs of rodent activity.
  • There were approximately 100 rodent droppings in a dry storage area, according to an inspector. An employee discarded the droppings.
  • An inspector observed five dead roaches on site. The roaches were discarded.
  • An inspector observed living/sleeping quarters on site that were not partitioned off or separated by self-closing doors. There was a baby crib with drawers and toys inside along a wall in a dry storage area.
  • A handwash sink was blocked by a skid and a clothes hamper.
  • A handwashing sink had no hot water handle, and when the cold water was turned on, rust-colored water came from the hole where the hot water handle was supposed to be.
  • A wall at the cook line was soiled with accumulated grease, food debris and or dust.
  • Cut lettuce, rice, egg rolls and hard-boiled eggs were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Some items were removed and others were sent to a reach-in cooler for rapid cooling.
  • Mosquito repellent was stored above a slicer and prep table. The bottle was removed.
  • An employee was eating a food prep area. The employee moved to the lobby.
  • Jugs of oil were stored on the floor of a dry storage area.
  • There was accumulated grease on the cook line.
  • In-use tongs were stored on an equipment door handle. The tongs were removed.
  • No soap was provided at a handwash sink.
  • An inspector observed cooked noodles at room temperature with no procedures for use of time as a public health control in place. The documentation was completed during the inspector’s visit.
  • Raw or undercooked animal food was offered at the establishment without a written consumer advisory. Corrective action was taken.
  • The restaurant passed a follow-up inspection on May 17 and was allowed to reopen.

Chung Shing, 8955 U.S. 301, Parrish

  • An inspector observed three dead roaches on site. The roaches were removed.
  • An employee was observed washing hands without soap at a sink not meant for handwashing.
  • Cooked shrimp, peas and carrots, raw chicken, raw beef, raw shrimp, sliced barbecue, rice noodles and tofu were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees, and bean sprouts were held at room temperature. A restaurant operator attempted to lower the temperature at the cooling unit and placed the bean sprouts in a cold holding unit.
  • Cooked chicken and cooked yellow rice were being held at room temperature without any temperature control. Both items were placed in refrigeration.
  • Raw beef and raw chicken were stored directly over ready-to-eat pasta in a walk-in cooler.
  • A box of broccoli was stored on the kitchen floor. Corrective action was taken.
  • Raw shrimp was being thawed in standing water. A restaurant operator turned on the water.
  • Single-service articles were not stored protected from contamination. Corrective action was taken.
  • Walk-in cooler gaskets were soiled with a slimy, mold-like buildup.
  • A wet wiping cloth was not stored in sanitizing solution in between uses. Corrective action was taken.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizer solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed.
  • In-use knives were stored between cracks in pieces of equipment.

Applebee’s Grill and Bar, 4638 S.R. 64, Bradenton

  • Shredded mozzarella and cheddar was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • Hot water at a handwash sink did not reach 100 degrees.
  • There was no proof of required training for three employees hired more than 60 days prior.
  • Coffee filters were not stored protected from contamination. Corrective action was taken.
  • Floor drains/drain covers were heavily soiled, according to an inspector.
  • Food was stored on the floor of a walk-in cooler. Corrective action was taken.

Slim’s Place, 204 Palmetto Ave., Anna Maria

  • Shellfish tags were not being properly maintained, and some were not marked with the last date the food was served. An employee organized the tags.
  • An inspector observed a case of onions stored on a table outside of the restaurant. The onions were brought inside.
  • In-use tongs were stored on an equipment door handle in between uses. The tongs were removed.
  • No handwashing sign was provided at a sink used by food employees. A restaurant operator made a sign.
  • A container of medicine was stored with food on the cook line. The medicine was removed.
  • An employee drink and phone were stored on a food prep table. The items were removed.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

River Strand Golf and Country Club, 7155 Grand Estuary Trail, Bradenton

  • A walk-in beer cooler had a build-up of mold-like substance inside.
  • An inspector observed mold growing inside of an ice bin at the bar where beverages were stored.
  • Heavy cream, shredded cheese, multiple pastas, hummus and rice were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. All of the food was sent to a walk-in cooler for rapid cooling.
  • Raw beef was stored above raw fish in a walk-in freezer. The beef was moved to the bottom shelf.
  • Fruit that was cut on site was held for more than 24 hours and not properly date-marked, according to an inspector. The fruit was discarded.
  • Required employee training was expired for one employee.
  • Jugs of oil were stored on the floor in a dry storage area. The jugs were shelved.
  • An employee was eating soup near a soup station. The employee moved to an area designated for employee eating.
  • Two soda gun holsters at the bar were soiled with accumulated slime and debris, and one soda gun was soiled.
  • A can of blueberry filling was dented. A stop sale was issued.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade. An employee cleaned it.

Butterfield’s Family Restaurant, 8205 U.S. 301, Parrish

  • Cut tomatoes, shredded cheese, feta cheese, gyro meat, Swiss cheese, cheddar cheese, provolone cheese and cooked sausage in a reach-in cooler were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Some of the foods were moved to a walk-in cooler and some were iced down.
  • Meatloaf, deli meat, butter, tzaziki, slaw mix and sour cream in a walk-in cooler were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • Butter was preset on tables sitting out at room temperature, according to an inspector.
  • Biscuits and raw potatoes were stored on the floor. The items were shelved.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were soiled with encrusted food debris.
  • Two cutting boards on the cook line had cut marks and were no longer cleanable.
  • Employee drinks were stored in coolers used for food storage. The drinks were removed.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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