Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Inspectors shut down Bradenton pizza place because of raw sewage

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report of Manatee County, Fire and Stone Pizza in Cortez was shut down when an inspector observed raw sewage in a ditch outside the establishment and sewer water coming up through drainage in the floor.

Several other Bradenton-area restaurants were cited for failing to properly maintain shellfish.

Fire and Stone Pizza, 10519 Cortez Road W., Bradenton

  • Fire and Stone pizza was temporarily closed on May 13 when an inspector observed several sewage-related issues on the premises.
  • A grease trap on the east side of the building had been removed and grease and sewage were overflowing onto the ground outside, according to an inspector.
  • Sewage was being pumped into a 5-foot by 6-foot by 15-foot ditch dug on the east side of the building. The sewage had collected and caused a slick in Sarasota Bay, according to an inspector. The restaurant owner was instructed to seal off all drains going out of the building.
  • Sewage from a handwashing sink was draining onto the floor, and sewage was coming up from floor drainage at a warewashing and preparation area.
  • Employee food and drink were stored in a walk-in cooler with customer food. A manager created a space for staff food.
  • There was a soil residue buildup on the interior lip of an ice machine.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution was not at the proper minimum strength. Corrective action was taken.
  • Multiple cans of food in a storage area were dented. A stop sale was issued.
  • An inspector observed approximately five flying insects at a prep station behind a buffet and two in a bar area.
  • Meat sauce was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees. The sauce was voluntarily discarded.
  • During a follow-up inspection on May 14, rain water had filled in the area where the grease trap was located. The restaurant owner stated that he was waiting on instructions from Manatee County before the trap could be replaced.
  • The drain pipes were still there, and a second hole had been dug at the south side of the building, exposing more pipes. A waste water compliance officer said that the owner was required to submit a special, one-time permit in order to receive permission to dump water into the sewer pipes, which is typically not permitted.
  • Sewage/waste water had filled the entire back kitchen and warewashing area.
  • The restaurant remained shut down.

Wasabi Japanese Steakhouse, 5770 Ranch Lake Blvd., Bradenton

  • An inspector observed one live roach near a dishmachine.
  • An inspector observed three dead roaches on the premises. Corrective action was taken.
  • An inspector observed one roach egg on the floor.
  • A bag of food was stored on the floor of a walk-in freezer. Corrective action was taken.
  • The ceiling was soiled with accumulated food debris, grease, dust or mold-like substance.
  • A cutting board had cut marks and was no longer cleanable.
  • The kitchen floor and floor drains and/or drain covers were heavily soiled.
  • Kitchen walls were soiled.
  • A knife at the sushi bar and a scoop in the kitchen were stored in water at less than 135 degrees in between uses.
  • There was no handwashing sign provided at a sink used by food employees.
  • No soap was provided at a handwash sink.
  • Raw fish was being thawed at room temperature in two handwashing sinks.
  • Single service articles were not stored protected from contamination.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were soiled with food debris and pitted with rust.
  • A wet wiping cloth on the cook line was note stored in sanitizer in between uses.
  • Milk was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • Sushi rice that was supposed to be monitored using time as a public health control had no time stamp.
  • Raw eggs were stored over margarine in a walk-in cooler.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacks knowledge of foodborne illnesses or symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • A manager lacked proof of food manager certification.
  • A spray bottle containing a toxic substance was not labeled.

Bridge Street Bistro, 111 Gulf Dr. S., Bradenton Beach

  • There was grease buildup inside of a warewashing machine, according to an inspector.
  • There was a buildup of mold-like substance in a walk-in beer cooler.
  • Vents throughout the kitchen were soiled.
  • A cutting board had cut marks and was no longer cleanable.
  • An employee drink was stored on a prep table. The drink was removed.
  • Flour was stored uncovered in a prep area.
  • An ice scoop handle was in contact with ice. An employee removed it.
  • A soda gun holster at the bar was soiled. A manager cleaned it.
  • The bottom of a reach-in cooler was soiled with liquid and food debris. A manager cleaned it.
  • A wall in the dishwashing area was soiled with accumulated black debris. An employee cleaned the area.
  • Heavy cream was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees. The cream was discarded.
  • Raw shrimps and scallops were stored over cut potatoes in a reach-in freezer. A manager moved the raw food lower than the ready-to-eat food.
  • Warewashing sanitizer exceeded the maximum concentration allowed. Corrective action was taken.
  • Shellfish tags were not marked with the last date the food was served.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade. An employee cleaned it.
  • The establishment was conducting non-continuous cooking of raw animal foods without written procedures approved by the Division of Hotels and Restaurants. A cook stated that tuna and chicken were partially cooked and then returned to cold holding until ordered. An inspector educated a manager regarding the noncontinuous cooking process and provided the required documentation.
  • A container of chips was blocking access to a handwash sink. The chips were moved.
  • A manager lacked proof of food manager certification.
  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.
  • No test kits were at hand to measure the strength of sanitizers in use for wiping cloths and at a three-compartment sink/warewashing machine.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

Rosedale Golf & Country Club, 5100 87th St. E., Bradenton

  • Cooked shrimp and soup were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • Raw shrimp were stored over potatoes in a walk-in freezer. The shrimp was moved to a lower shelf.
  • Shellfish tags were not marked with the last date the food was served.
  • Bug spray was stored with bowls at a prep table on the cook line. The bug spray was removed.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade. An employee cleaned the blade.
  • In-use tongs were stored on an oven door handle in between uses. A manager removed them.
  • The lip of an ice machine was soiled. Corrective action was taken.
  • Cut melon that was dated more than a week old was inside of a walk-in cooler on the cook line. The melon was discarded.
  • An employee drink was stored on a prep table. Corrective action was taken.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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