Food & Drink

More dirty dining: Bugs, mold and more problems at these Bradenton-area restaurants

What is the lifespan of a restaurant?

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.
Up Next
Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

According to the latest inspection of Manatee County restaurants, several local businesses are failing to keep food at safe temperatures.

One restaurant was cited when an inspector saw flying insects in food storage areas.

Poppo’s Taqueria Outpost, 5942 34th St. W., Bradenton

  • An inspector observed 10 flying insects settling on a bag of onions in a dry storage area and four flying insects in a separate dry storage area for produce.
  • Cooked rice was hot held at a temperature less than 135 degrees. A stop sale was issued and the rice was discarded.
  • An employee drink was stored over the cook line while food was being prepared.
  • A bag of flour in a dry storage area was open and uncovered.
  • Black beans removed from heat were not cooled from 135 to 70 degrees within two hours. A stop sale was issued.
  • Chemical oven cleaner was stored next to cooked rice. The rice was removed from the area.
  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.

Michelangelo 301, 11255 U.S. 301, Parrish

  • Multiple pizzas, stromboli and garlic knots were stored on top of a glass display case without protection from contamination. A restaurant operator moved the food to the kitchen.
  • An employee was observed touching pizza with bare hands after it had been removed from the oven. The pizza was discarded.
  • Pizza sauce, butter, tiramisu, mozzarella, sliced tomatoes, sausage, sliced ham and mascarpone were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • Marinara sauce was hot held at a temperature less than 135 degrees. The food was discarded.
  • Pizza at the front counter had no time stamp marking when it had been removed from temperature control.
  • There was an accumulation of black/green mold-like substance inside of an ice machine.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade.
  • A handwash sink was not accessible for employee use due to a bucket stored inside. Corrective action was taken.
  • Single service articles were not stored protected from contamination.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution was not at the proper minimum strength. Corrective action was taken.
  • Dishmachine sanitizer was not at the proper minimum strength. Corrective action was taken.
  • No hot water was available in the entire establishment. Corrective action was taken.
  • A probe thermometer was not accurate.

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

Sea Star Café, 11544 Palmbrush Trail, Bradenton

  • There was accumulated grease on the kitchen floor near a fryer.
  • Reach-in cooler shelves were pitted with rust.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were pitted with rust.
  • There was a mold-like buildup on and around a fan guard in a walk-in cooler.
  • All of the foods in a walk in cooler were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees, including hollandaise, salmon, cut melon, gravy, multiple kinds of cheese, raw eggs, milk, raw chicken, turkey, ham, cream cheese, butter and raw turkey bacon.
  • In a reach-in cooler, hard-boiled eggs, American cheese, Swiss cheese, provolone cheese, cut tomatoes and leafy greens were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • Dishmachine sanitizer was not at the proper minimum strength.
  • A cutting board was stained/soiled.
  • No test kit was at hand to measure the strength of sanitizer used for wiping cloths.

Del Webb at Lakewood Ranch Homeowner’s Association, 6919 Del Webb Blvd., Lakewood

  • A cook with no beard guard was engaged in food preparation.
  • No handwashing sign or soap were provided at a sink used by food employees. A manager put a sign and soap at the sink.
  • Three large cans of apricot glaze were dented. A stop sale was issued.
  • Raw meats were stored over french fries and cooked chicken. A manager moved the fries and chicken.
  • Fish that was stored inside of a reduced-oxygen package was no longer frozen. The inspector educated a manager regarding proper thawing technique.
  • There was an encrusted material on a can opener blade. Corrective action was taken.

Golden Corral, 5525 Cortez Road W., Bradenton

  • An inspector observed one dead roach in the warewashing area. A manager discarded the roach.
  • The ceiling was soiled with accumulated food debris, grease and dust.
  • Employee phones were stored in a meat cutting area. The phones were removed.
  • There was standing water on the floor throughout the warewashing, food preparation and kitchen areas.
  • A flexible pipe was draining onto the floor. A manage moved the pipe into a drain.
  • A three-compartment sink was missing components and draining gray matter directly onto the floor. Employees were walking in the liquid. A manager said that the pipes had been put back together wrong after cleaning and an employee fixed the sink.
  • There was grease accumulated around fryers in the kitchen.
  • The floor of a walk-in freezer was soiled with box and tape debris. An employee cleaned the floor.
  • A flexible pipe was draining onto the floor. A manage moved the pipe into a drain.
  • Food debris was accumulated under bakery cabinetry.
  • A large can of green beans and a large can of corned beef were dented. A stop sale was issued.

Restaurant Inspection_fitted.jpeg

Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

Related stories from Bradenton Herald

  Comments