Audubon Florida biologist Jerry Lorenz holds a stalk of dead seagrass. Since last summer, about 40,000 acres of seagrass have died, wiping out critical habitat for the bay’s marine life.
Audubon Florida biologist Jerry Lorenz holds a stalk of dead seagrass. Since last summer, about 40,000 acres of seagrass have died, wiping out critical habitat for the bay’s marine life. Jenny Staletovich Miami Herald Staff
Audubon Florida biologist Jerry Lorenz holds a stalk of dead seagrass. Since last summer, about 40,000 acres of seagrass have died, wiping out critical habitat for the bay’s marine life. Jenny Staletovich Miami Herald Staff

Will Florida Bay survive the summer?

June 17, 2016 11:48 AM

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