Letters to the Editor

Virtual school allows parents, children to thrive in learning environment

FILE - Kindergarten students listen as a teacher reads on the first day of school in Beaverton, Ore. A last-minute amendment to the Republicans' tax plan would allow parents to use savings from 529 education savings accounts to pay for K-12 education, including homeschool expenses.
FILE - Kindergarten students listen as a teacher reads on the first day of school in Beaverton, Ore. A last-minute amendment to the Republicans' tax plan would allow parents to use savings from 529 education savings accounts to pay for K-12 education, including homeschool expenses. AP

My children attend Florida Virtual School Full Time, a public, free virtual school. What a Christmas gift it has been! We were interested in virtual school because it allows us (the parents) to actually be with our children and monitor what they’re learning and who’s teaching them. Another perk, of course, is the flexibility of the program, which is awesome. It gives us the freedom to schedule the children’s lessons in a way that works for us.

My husband and I serve as their “learning coaches,” the people who help keep them accountable for their assignments and diligent in their studies. My children’s lessons are tailored to their style of learning. They have access to the daily lessons on their computers, and connect with their teachers in a variety of ways and interact with fellow students online, where they are “virtually” in the classroom. Students also connect in person, at school events and field trips.

We’re all thriving under this new schooling environment. I wouldn’t have it any other way. The classroom is anywhere where there is access to Internet. So even while vacationing out of state or out of country, we still have access to schoolwork, awesome.

So this holiday season, I’m writing to say “Thank you” to the governor, the Board of Education, and Legislature for providing the gift of funding for charter education. Thank you to all the parents, educators, students, and community leaders who spoke up and said this program was needed for students across the state who are academically gifted, need extra assistance, want or need a flexible schedule, or seek an alternative to the traditional classroom. Virtual schooling more than works, it abounds.

Belen Espinoza

Bradenton

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