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Grab an umbrella. Forecasters predict rainy, muggy weather for first day of school in Manatee 

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Kids heading back to school and anyone else venturing outdoors on Monday may want to bring along a raincoat and umbrella.

Rain is likely in Manatee County, according to the National Weather Service. Odds are especially good for early morning and late afternoon showers around school start and finish times.

In Bradenton, there’s a 60 percent chance of rain, with scattered showers and thunderstorms likely before 11 a.m. and again after 2 p.m. There is also a possibility of a thunderstorm between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., according to NWS. Up to a half of an inch of rain is predicted.

In the east Manatee County/Myakka City area, there’s a 50 percent chance of rain, with scattered showers and thunderstorms most likely after 8 a.m. and up to a half of an inch of rainfall possible.

Despite the rain clouds, forecasters are predicting muggy conditions with heat indexes well over 100 degrees.

Partly sunny skies are expected to prevail, with a high near 90 and a heat index as high as 106 in Bradenton and a high near 91 and heat index as high as 108 in Myakka City.

At heat indexes of 103-124 degrees, heat cramps or heat exhaustion are likely and heat stroke is possible with prolonged exposure to heat and/or physical activity outside, according to NWS.

Tips to stay safe from the heat include:

  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Wear light weight and loose fitting clothing.
  • Stay inside an air-conditioned environment, if possible.
  • Move indoors if the heat becomes overwhelming as soon as possible.
  • Anyone overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location immediately.
  • Heat stroke is a medical emergency, call 911.
  • Do not leave pets outside in the heat.
  • Never leave a pet or a child inside a parked vehicle.

Symptoms of a heat stroke include:

  • Throbbing headache.
  • Dizziness.
  • Lack of sweating despite the heat.
  • Red, hot and dry skin.
  • Muscle weakness or cramps.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Rapid heartbeat.
  • Rapid and shallow breathing.

The latest seasonal outlook from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts above-average temperatures sticking around through October.

The Atlantic is currently free of tropical disturbances that could develop into tropical storms, according to the National Hurricane Center. No tropical cyclones are expected to form in the next five days.

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