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Flood warning issued for Manatee River through Saturday afternoon

Thunderstorms can come in several destructive varieties

The National Weather Service explains the four types of thunderstorms: single cell; multi-cell cluster; squall line; and supercell. Thunderstorms can produce dangerous lightning, damaging hail and winds, tornadoes and flash flooding.
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The National Weather Service explains the four types of thunderstorms: single cell; multi-cell cluster; squall line; and supercell. Thunderstorms can produce dangerous lightning, damaging hail and winds, tornadoes and flash flooding.

Following heavy rains in Manatee County, the National Weather Service has issued a flood warning for the Manatee River through Saturday afternoon.

The river reached flood stage at 12.6 feet at 9 a.m. on Thursday. It is forecast to rise to about 13.3 feet by Thursday night and already is causing minor flooding near Kibler Road in Myakka City in east Manatee County, according to the NWS.

The river is predicted to fall back below flood stage by late Saturday morning or early Saturday afternoon.

Motorists are reminded to never drive on flooded roads as it only take inches of water to lift a vehicle from the roadway.

The NWS will continue to monitor the flooding, which could be worsened by more rainfall.

Rain chances are relatively low for Manatee County and the Bradenton area for the end of the week.

On Thursday, scattered showers and thunderstorms are possible, with a 30 percent chance of rain in Bradenton and a 30 percent chance of rain further inland in Myakka City. The heat index could rise as high as 103 degrees in both parts of the county, according to the NWS. Sunny conditions are expected to prevail.

Rain chances drop to 10 percent for Bradenton on Thursday night, but remain at 30 percent for Myakka City.

On Friday, daytime rain chances are at 20 percent in Bradenton, with mostly sunny conditions and a heat index as high as 103. Rain chances drop to 20 percent in Myakka City, with mostly sunny conditions and a heat index as high as 104.

High temperatures and heat indexes over 100 degrees are forecast to hang around over the weekend.

At heat indexes of 103-124 degrees, heat cramps or heat exhaustion are likely and heat stroke is possible with prolonged exposure to heat and/or physical activity outside, according to NWS.

Tips to stay safe from the heat include:

  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Wear light weight and loose fitting clothing.
  • Stay inside an air-conditioned environment, if possible.
  • Move indoors if the heat becomes overwhelming as soon as possible.
  • Anyone overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location immediately.
  • Heat stroke is a medical emergency, call 911.
  • Do not leave pets outside in the heat.
  • Never leave a pet or a child inside a parked vehicle.

Symptoms of a heat stroke include:

  • Throbbing headache.
  • Dizziness.
  • Lack of sweating despite the heat.
  • Red, hot and dry skin.
  • Muscle weakness or cramps.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Rapid heartbeat.
  • Rapid and shallow breathing.

The latest seasonal outlook from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts above-average temperatures sticking around through October.

The Atlantic is currently free of tropical disturbances that could develop into tropical storms, according to the National Hurricane Center. No tropical cyclones are expected to form in the next five days.

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