Weather News

Friday’s forecast: Definitely more heat, and maybe some thunderstorms

How to stay safe in really hot weather

As summer temperatures rise, so does the chance of heat-related illnesses for you, your kids and pets. Here's how to enjoy the hot weather safely.
Up Next
As summer temperatures rise, so does the chance of heat-related illnesses for you, your kids and pets. Here's how to enjoy the hot weather safely.

Bradenton, Manatee County and the rest of the Tampa Bay area are in for a hot weekend, according to the National Weather Service.

A heat wave is impacting the Central and Eastern United States, and it’s pushing national temperatures above annual averages.

Locally, heat indexes are expected to top 100 degrees on Friday, Saturday and Sunday; partly sunny conditions are likely to prevail.

There’s also a decent chance for afternoon storms all weekend long.

Friday is forecast to have a high around 92 degrees and a low around 76, with a heat index of up to 104 degrees. Rain chances are placed at 30 percent, with scattered showers and thunderstorms most likely between 5 and 8 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday are forecast to have highs in the low 90s and lows around 75, with heat indexes topping out around 103 degrees. There’s a 30 percent chance of rain on Saturday and a 40 percent chance on Sunday.

Scattered showers and thunderstorms are most likely to occur in the afternoon both days.

As for the heat, it is likely here to stay.

The latest seasonal outlook from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts above-average temperatures sticking around through October.

In Florida, high summer heat indexes are nothing out of the ordinary, but this year has already been exceptionally hot. May’s temperatures broke state heat records, and June came close.

At heat indexes of 103-124 degrees, heat cramps or heat exhaustion are likely and heat stroke is possible with prolonged exposure to heat and/or physical activity outside, according to NWS.

Tips to stay safe from the heat include:

  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Wear light weight and loose fitting clothing.
  • Stay inside an air-conditioned environment, if possible.
  • Move indoors if the heat becomes overwhelming as soon as possible.
  • Anyone overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location immediately.
  • Heat stroke is a medical emergency, call 911.
  • Do not leave pets outside in the heat.
  • Never leave a pet or a child inside a parked vehicle.

Symptoms of a heat stroke include:

  • Throbbing headache.
  • Dizziness.
  • Lack of sweating despite the heat.
  • Red, hot and dry skin.
  • Muscle weakness or cramps.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Rapid heartbeat.
  • Rapid and shallow breathing.

For now, it’s good news on the hurricane front. The Atlantic is currently free of tropical disturbances that could develop into tropical storms, according to the National Hurricane Center.

  Comments