Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Roach activity temporarily closes Bradenton steakhouse

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

Roach activity at the Samurai Japanese Steak House in Bradenton left the restaurant closed for a day while they corrected the issues.

Other restaurants were cited for rodent droppings, mold and old food in the latest restaurant inspection report.

Samurai Japanese Steak House, 3611 First St. #110, Bradenton

  • Health officials ordered the Samurai Japanese Steak House to be temporarily closed on May 29 when an inspector found five live roaches inside of an inoperable freezer gasket. Corrective action was taken.
  • Raw eggs were stored above ready-to-eat cut vegetables in the restaurant’s preparation area.
  • A certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of which foodborne illnesses would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • The dish machine’s chlorine sanitizer was not at proper strength, an inspector said.
  • The restaurant met inspection standards during a May 30 follow-up visit and was allowed to reopen.

Harry’s Grill, 9903 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria

  • An inspector found evidence of rodent activity in a dry storage unit separate from the restaurant’s main building. There were 36 droppings on the shelves, where boxed and wrapped single service items are held, according to a report.
  • About six small flying insects were located at the restaurant’s bar.
  • There was an accumulation of black/green mold-like substance in the interior of the ice machine at the bar area.

Another Broken Egg Cafe, 6115 Exchange Way, Bradenton

  • There was an accumulation of dead insects inside of a control device by the restaurant’s back door, an inspector said.
  • There was an accumulation of mold-like substance in the ice chute of the ice machine.
  • An employee failed to wash hands in between changing gloves.

D. Americo’s Pizzeria, 812 62nd Circle E. #102, Bradenton

  • A pesticide-emitting strip was present in the food prep area, according to an inspector’s report.
  • Cooked sausage prepared on site and held more than 24 hours had not been properly date marked.

Danny’s Pizzeria, 7220 Manatee Ave. W. #18, Bradenton

  • A stop sale was issued on pasta, turkey, lasagna and other foods that were being cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • An inspector educated employees who were seen washing their hands improperly and touching their clothing while wearing gloves.
  • There was no proof of required state-approved employee training for an employee hired more than 60 days ago.

Tiramisu Ristorante and Pizzeria, 5215 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • Marinara sauce and chicken broth were hot held at temperatures lower than 135 degrees, an inspector said. The issue was corrected.
  • Tiramisu that was more than a week old was still in a refrigerator in the restaurant. The food was discarded.
  • Clam/mussel/oyster tags not marked with the last date served.

El Tio Carlos, 1706 First St. E., Bradenton

  • Ham, hot dogs, lettuce and other foods were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees, an inspector said. Corrective action was taken.
  • A toxic bottle of bug spray was stored on the side of the ice machine. The issue was corrected.
  • Ready-to-eat food that was prepared on site was held more than 24 hours without being properly date marked.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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