Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Roach in Alfredo sauce forces shutdown of Manatee Italian restaurant

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

A Manatee County Italian restaurant was ordered to temporarily close their doors after an inspector discovered a dead roach in the restaurant’s Alfredo sauce.

According to the latest restaurant inspection report, other restaurants were cited for mold, temperature and hand washing issues.

Primo Ristorante, 8076 N. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota

  • The restaurant was ordered to be temporarily closed after an inspector said they found a dead roach in the Alfredo sauce and another on a slicer on May 30.
  • A stop sale was issued on the the Alfredo sauce “due to food not being in a whole, sound condition,” according to an inspector’s report. The restaurant operator discarded the sauce.
  • Three live roaches were located on a drain board above a sink. The operator killed and discarded the roaches.
  • A roach egg was observed near the hand washing sink on the cook line. Corrective action was taken.
  • Various foods, including Alfredo sauce, spaghetti and lasagna, were being cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • The ware washing sanitizing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed, according to an inspector.
  • There was no proof of state-approved employee training for two employees hired more than 60 days ago.
  • One employee received employee training from an unapproved provider.
  • The restaurant met inspection standards during a May 31 follow-up visit and was allowed to reopen.

S.O.B. Burgers, 5866 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • The restaurant was operating without a license from the Division of Hotels and Restaurants. The owner was ordered to obtain a public food service license within 30 days. S.O.B. Burgers remains open and is in the process of obtaining the license, an inspector wrote.
  • The restaurant had not submitted renovation plans for approval. An inspector ordered the restaurant to have plans approved within 30 days.
  • An employee was seen preparing a burger with their bare hands.

Banana Factory, 6916 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • A stop sale was issued on heavy cream that was being cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees.

Panera Bread, 1520 Cortez Road W., Bradenton

  • Diced chicken and sliced turkey were cold at temperatures greater than 41 degrees, according to an inspector. Corrective action was taken.
  • The ice chute at a self-service drink station was soiled with a build up of mold-like substance/slime. The issue was corrected.

Hooter’s, 4908 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • Smoked wings were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees, according to an inspector.

WingHouse of Bradenton, 5105 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • Fried chicken was being hot held at a temperature lower than 135 degrees.
  • There was no proof of required state-approved training for an employee hired more than 60 days ago.

Burger King, 551 10th St. E., Palmetto

  • Raw chicken was stored above onion rings in the freezer. The issue was corrected.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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