Food & Drink

Dirty dining: Inspectors shut down Bradenton restaurant because of rodent droppings

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report of Manatee County, a Bradenton pool hall was temporarily shut down when an inspector observed rodent droppings on site.

Another Bradenton restaurant was cited for having moldy pork in a cooler.

Pool Room Forty One, 5106 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • Pool Room Forty One was temporarily closed on May 20 when an inspector observed signs of rodent activity.
  • There were approximately nine rodent droppings on the floor near shelving at the rear kitchen exit. A restaurant operator removed and discarded the droppings.
  • No handwashing sign was provided at a sink used by food employees.
  • Sanitizer for manual warewashing was not at the proper minimum strength.
  • Bottled water was stored on the floor. Corrective action was taken.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illness or symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • An open container of half and half was not properly date-marked.
  • A manager’s food manager certification was expired.
  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.
  • No soap was provided at a handwash sink at the bar.
  • The establishment was allowed to reopen after a follow-up inspection on May 21. An additional follow-up visit was required.

Acapulco Mexican Restaurant, 1833 Lakewood Ranch Blvd., Bradenton

  • An inspector observed one dead roach on site. During a follow-up visit, an inspector observed another dead roach.
  • An inspector found cooked pork with mold growing on it in a walk-in-cooler. The pork was more than a week old according to its date-marking. A stop sale was issued and the pork was discarded.
  • An employee used a handwash sink as a dump sink. An inspector educated the employee regarding proper use of handwash sinks.
  • A pan and a scratch pad were stored in a handwash sink.
  • Chili relleno, shrimp ceviche, taquitos and containers of beans were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. During a follow-up visit, an inspector observed sour cream, cooked beef, pico de gallo, cut tomatoes, cut lettuce and shredded cheese at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • An employee phone was stored on the cook line. The phone was removed.
  • In-use tongs were stored on an oven door handle in between uses. The tongs were removed.
  • Unwashed mushrooms were stored over tea and horchata. The produce was moved to a bottom shelf.
  • Raw eggs were stored over whipped cream, and raw beef was stored over ready-to-eat chicken and mozzarella sticks. Corrective action was taken.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were pitted with rust.

Tarpon Bay Grill and Tiki Bar, 7150 N. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota

  • The ceiling was soiled over the cook line.
  • The floor in a warewashing area was dirty, and a wall was soiled with accumulated black debris.
  • In-use tongs were stored on an equipment door handle. Corrective action was taken.
  • Dishwashing sanitizer was not at the proper minimum strength.
  • Wiping cloth sanitizing solution exceeded the maximum concentration allowed.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illness or symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • An open container of half and half was not properly date-marked.
  • Steak was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • There was no probe thermometer at hand to measure the temperature of food products.
  • There was no soap provided at a handwash sink at the bar. Corrective action was taken.

Smashburger, 2805 University Parkway, Sarasota

  • Cheddar cheese and pepper jack cheese were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • Open milk was not properly date-marked.
  • A manager’s food manager certification had expired.
  • The ice chute on a self-service drink machine was soiled with a buildup of mold-like substance/slime.
  • Walk-in cooler shelves were soiled with encrusted food debris.
  • A walk-in freezer floor was soiled.
  • An employee with an ineffective hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.

Ever wonder why that restaurant on the corner always seems to change? It turns out the lifespan of most restaurants are pretty short.

Beach Bistro, 6600 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach

  • Duckling, cooked carrots and meatballs were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • A plumbing issue caused water going down the drain of a handwash sink to go into a prep sink.
  • An in-use ice scoop was not stored protected from contamination in between uses. A manager put the scoop in an enclosed container.
  • In-use utensils were stored in standing water at less than 135 degrees. A manager removed the utensils from the water.
  • Food held using time as a public health control was still in use after it had exceeded the four-hour limit.
  • An employee was observed using a handwash sink as a dump sink. Corrective action was taken.
  • Hot water was not provided at handwash sinks in the men’s and women’s restrooms.

Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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