Food & Drink

Chicken strips sold at Publix, Walmart, other stores recalled. They may have metal in them

What to do if you think you have a recalled product

There are many numbers and dates on the foods, drugs, cosmetics, and other products we use every day. When unsafe products must be removed from the market, these numbers and dates can help identify them quickly.
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There are many numbers and dates on the foods, drugs, cosmetics, and other products we use every day. When unsafe products must be removed from the market, these numbers and dates can help identify them quickly.

March’s not-food-in-your-food recall of Tyson chicken strips after two customers complained of metal has bloated by four complaints, nine brands selling 22 varieties of chicken strips and over 11 million pounds.

The total tonnage now covered in the recall: 11,829,517 pounds of chicken strips. Among the store brands now included are Walmart, Publix, Southeastern Grocers’ SE Grocers (Winn-Dixie, Fresco y Mas, Bi-Lo, Harvey’s), Meijer, Food Lion, Aldi and Giant Eagle. The full list can be found here.

The chicken strips were produced from Oct. 1, 2018 through March 8, 2019 and have use by dates from Oct. 1, 2019 through March 7, 2020. Establishment No. P-7221 is on the back. If you have these chicken strips, clip the UPC and date cods, toss them out and call Tyson at 1-866-886-8456.

According to the USDA recall notice that posted late Friday night, the agency’s Food Safety Inspection Service has heard of “six complaints during this time frame involving similar pieces of metal with three alleging oral injury.”

“Consumers expect that the food they eat is safe. In their best interest and in an abundance of caution we’re taking quick and decisive action to expand this recall,” said Barbara Masters, Tyson Foods’ vice president of regulatory food policy, food and agriculture. “Our company is taking corrective action at the location that makes these products. We have discontinued use of the specific equipment believed to be associated with the metal fragments, and we will be installing metal-detecting X-ray machinery to replace the plant’s existing metal-detection system. We will also be using a third-party video auditing system for metal-detection verification.”

Anyone with questions about this can call Tyson Foods at the above number.

Since 1989, David J. Neal’s domain at the Miami Herald has expanded to include writing about Panthers (NHL and FIU), Dolphins, old school animation, food safety, fraud, naughty lawyers, bad doctors and all manner of breaking news. He drinks coladas whole. He does not work Indianapolis 500 Race Day.


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