Food & Drink

Dirty dining: These restaurants are holding your food at unsafe temperatures, inspectors say

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2017-18

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2017-18 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report, several Manatee County restaurants were holding food at unsafe temperatures.

Meanwhile, a handful of Bradenton-area restaurants were cited for employee training issues.

Chick-fil-A, 4573 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • During a follow-up visit, an inspector again observed foods being held at unsafe temperatures. Milk wash, fried chicken, spicy chicken and diced hard boiled eggs were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Another follow-up inspection was required.

Burger King, 3235 University Parkway, Sarasota

  • Vanilla dairy mixture in an ice cream machine was cold held at a temperature greater than 41 degrees.
  • Fish patties, crispy chicken and spiced chicken that were supposed to be held using time as a public health control had no time stamps assessed. Tomatoes with an expired time stamp were still in use. A stop sale was issued for all of the foods.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • There was no proof of required training for two employees that were hired more than 60 days prior.
  • The floor of a walk-in freezer was soiled.

Wendy’s, 5411 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • During a follow-up visit, an inspector again observed foods being held at unsafe temperatures. Sliced tomatoes, blue cheese, cut lettuce and asiago cheese were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. A follow-up inspection was required.

Greens of Manatee Golf Course, 101 Cortez Road W., Bradenton

  • Hot dogs and half and half creamer held for more than 24 hours were not properly date-marked after opening.
  • Chicken noodle soup and Santa Fe soup and chili in a reach-in cooler were not properly date-marked.
  • No handwashing sign was provided at a sink used by food employees in the male restroom.
  • Reach-in cooler shelves were pitted with rust.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation.
  • Bottled water was stored on the floor.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • There was no probe thermometer at hand to measure food items held at 41 degrees or below.

Keke’s Breakfast Cafe, 1121 Cortez Road W., Bradenton

  • Swiss cheese, provolone cheese, sliced ham and cheddar cheese were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • There was no proof of required training for four employees hired more than 60 days ago.

S.O.B. Burgers, 5866 14th St. W., Bradenton

  • The ceiling, ceiling tiles and/or vents on the cook line were soiled with accumulated dust, according to an inspector.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • The establishment was operating without a license from the Division of Hotels and Restaurants.
  • No test kit was at hand to measure the strength of sanitizer in use at a three-compartment sink/warewashing machine.
  • There was no proof of required training for any employees.
  • Chili and baked beans in a reach-in cooler had no date marking.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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