Food & Drink

More Dirty Dining: Bradenton-area restaurants cited for false advertising, mold

A statewide look at Florida’s top restaurant violations for 2016-17

Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2016-17 in Florida restaurant kitchens.
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Restaurant inspections ensure food retail establishments are in compliance with state sanitation and food safety procedures. Here are the top ten violations inspectors found between 2016-17 in Florida restaurant kitchens.

According to the latest inspection report, multiple Bradenton-area restaurants had mold on premises. A handful of restaurants were also cited for storing food at unsafe temperatures.

Subway, 5016 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton

  • An inspector said meatballs from the previous day were not reheated to a temperature of at least 165 degrees within two hours.
  • The back of an ice-chute on a self-service soda machine was covered with mold-like substance.
  • There was mold-like substance at the door of a walk-in-freezer.
  • The restaurant had no certified food manager.
  • Required employee training was expired for one employee.

Shake Pit, 3801 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton

  • Raw hamburger and cut leafy greens were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees.
  • Lettuce, cheese and tomatoes were not properly time marked, and the time that the foods were removed from temperature control could not be determined. According to an inspector, an operator was using a chart to track times but was unable to produce records for the last three days.
  • Debris and mold-like substance were found in a reach-in cooler and on food contacted surfaces. Corrective action was taken.
  • There was no proof of professional hygiene training for employees touching ready-to-eat food with bare hands.
  • There was standing water in the bottom of a reach-in cooler.

Taquería Morales Taco Truck, 5645 15 St. E., Bradenton

  • An inspector observed cut lettuce, refried beans and yellow rice cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • The certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of foodborne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent an employee from working with food.
  • There was no test kit to measure the strength of chlorine sanitizer.
  • There was no probe thermometer on hand to measure the temperature of food products.
  • Required employee training was expired for one employee.
  • An employee engaged in food preparation had no hair restraint.

The WingHouse Bar & Grill, 2015 60th Ave. E., Ellenton

  • Beef, fish and cooked ribs were cold held at temperatures greater than 41 degrees. Corrective action was taken.
  • The interior of a reach-in cooler was soiled with an accumulation of food residue.
  • There was no soap provided at a handwash sink. Corrective action was taken.
  • The inside of a soda gun at the bar was soiled.

Tokyo Thai, 5959 Factory Shops Blvd., Ellenton

  • There was an accumulation of black/green mold-like substance inside of an ice bin.
  • There was an accumulation of black/green mold-like substance around soda dispensing nozzles.
  • A menu advertised white tuna but escolar was actually served.
  • A handwash sink did not reach 100 degrees or have enough water pressure to properly wash hands.
  • An employee with no hair restraint was engaged in food preparation. Corrective action was taken.
  • Proof of required training was not available for a sushi chef hired more than 60 days previously.

Little Caesars, 4458 Cortez Road, Bradenton

  • An inspector could not determine when food had been removed from temperature control. Corrective action was taken.
  • No handwashing sign was provided at a sink used by employees.
  • Two employee beverages were mixed with customer food in the walk-in cooler.
  • There was encrusted material on a can opener blade.

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Editor’s Note: According to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation, these reports are a “snapshot” of the conditions present at the time of the inspection and are public record. The agency is required to inspect every licensed restaurant at least once per year, but new and “high-risk” establishments tend to be inspected more frequently.

When an emergency shutdown order is given by an inspector, it must first be reviewed and approved by agency supervisors. In order for a business to reopen, an inspector will continue visiting the establishment daily until compliance is met. Some citations may include a financial penalty. Inspectors may also respond to complaints, which can be filed here.

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