Letters to the Editor

Compromise key to stronger nation

After rushing from a news conference, House Speaker Paul Ryan waits in his ceremonial office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015, for the arrival of Israeli President Reuven Rivlin. Ryan has told House Republicans a deal has been reached on a year-end tax and spending bill.
After rushing from a news conference, House Speaker Paul Ryan waits in his ceremonial office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015, for the arrival of Israeli President Reuven Rivlin. Ryan has told House Republicans a deal has been reached on a year-end tax and spending bill. The Associated Press

How to get our government working again!

We are all fed up with government gridlock caused by constant electioneering and finger pointing. I recently saw a TED Talk by Arthur Brooks. In general, he said that liberals and conservatives can come together if we can address the problem of Politically Motivated Asymmetry and convert the holy war of ideas into a competition of ideas. We need diversity of thought, not “My way or the highway.”

For example, liberals like to address society problems like poverty. Conservatives like free-market solutions. We can do both. Between 1990 and 2010, world poverty declined 50 percent — not because of government bureaucracy but because of globalization, freer trade, property rights, rule of law and entrepreneurship.

Let’s stop thinking that the government can fix everything wrong in our society by creating an agency. An agency in charge of making, enforcing and adjudicating rules to tell us what we can say, what we should eat, how much we can pay, how to raise our children or where we can go to the bathroom. Let’s start working together to pick the problems that should be solved and develop free-market solutions to solve them.

Our government should defend our national interests, make as few laws as possible, enforce the ones it makes and allow us, its citizens, to be as successful and as charitable as we desire. Our families and schools need to develop citizens with good moral character. Citizens, not government, will build a moral society.

Our great experiment in a republican democracy is still the best government there is. We can keep it strong long into our future with a little less of itself, less government and more cooperation! We need to work towards solutions through compromise, not I’m right and you’re wrong!

Gerry Hayes

Parrish

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