Hurricane

National Hurricane Center gets new chief just in time for upcoming season

Kenneth Graham, a career meteorologist based on the Gulf Coast, was named the new director of the National Hurricane Center on Thursday. He begins his new post April 1, a month before this year’s hurricane season officially begins.
Kenneth Graham, a career meteorologist based on the Gulf Coast, was named the new director of the National Hurricane Center on Thursday. He begins his new post April 1, a month before this year’s hurricane season officially begins. AP

A career meteorologist who earned his chops along the busy Gulf Coast was named the new chief of the National Hurricane Center in Miami Thursday, filling a vacancy created when former director Rick Knabb departed just before last year’s brutal season.

Kenneth Graham will assume his new post on April 1, two months before the 2018 season officially begins.

For the last decade, Graham has been the meteorologist-in-charge of the National Weather Service’s New Orleans and Baton Rouge office. He helped provide local forecasts during last year’s frantic season, which produced 17 named storms, along with Hurricanes Gustav and Ike in 2008 and Isaac in 2012.

NHC Kenneth Graham
Kennth Graham, a career meteorologist with the National Weather Service based on the Gulf Coast, was named the new director of the National Hurricane Center on Thursday. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

In 2010, when BP’s Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded, killing 11 workers and spewing 3 million barrels of oil over 87 days, Graham established two command centers. Forecasts from the center helped guide cleanup efforts for five months, according to a statement from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which oversees the hurricane center.

“Ken has a long history of providing dependable [decisions] in all positions in which he has served,” National Weather Service Director Louis Uccellini said in a statement announcing the news to agency employees. “His reputation among his colleagues and across the weather, water, and climate enterprise is unparalleled.”

Before taking over in New Orleans, Graham was the systems operations chief at the weather service’s southern regional headquarters in Fort Worth, which serves as a communications hub for the agency’s southern operations. There, he helped lead recovery efforts after Hurricane Katrina, which left more than 1,800 dead and caused $108 billion in damage after a catastrophic landfall in New Orleans. Graham also served as the meteorological service chief at the weather service’s headquarters in Maryland and was meteorologist-in-charge of local forecast offices in Birmingham, Alabama, and Corpus Christi, Texas.

Graham started with NOAA in 1994, working in the Slidell, Louisiana, offices in 1995 when heavy rain triggered widespread flooding that caused $3 billion in damage. Before that, Graham worked as a TV weatherman in Mississippi.

He has a bachelor’s degree in atmospheric science from the University of Arizona and a master’s in geoscience from Mississippi State. He takes over from Ed Rappaport, who was named acting director after Knabb’s departure and who will resume his position as deputy director.

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