State Politics

Florida House panel rejects pitch to pause school grades

TALLAHASSEE -- A proposal to eliminate some testing requirements for Florida schoolchildren won the unanimous support of a second House committee on Thursday.

The real debate centered around an amendment proposed by Rep. Mia Jones.

Jones, D-Jacksonville, proposed holding off on school grades during the transition to new standards and assessments -- something superintendents, school board members and parent groups have long been asking for.

Jones noted that students had trouble accessing Florida's new online exams last week -- the result of both software problems and cyber attacks -- and argued it would be unfair to hold students responsible for the results.

"Today, I ask you not to put a scarlet letter on our young people," she said.

Several members of the public spoke in support of her recommendation.

Duval County School Board member Becki Couch pointed out that when the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Tests were given for the first time in 1998, the results were used only as a baseline and not for high-stakes decisions.

"School grades would be meaningless this year because there would not be a baseline [and] there would not have been a uniform testing environment that was provided for the students," Couch said.

Joy Frank, of the Florida Association of District School Superintendents, said pausing school grades for a year would "recalibrate the system."

"This is not been an easy transition,” Frank said. "The teachers have been working very hard and diligently to implement these standards and administer this test with fidelity. The students have been prepared and ready to take the assessment, and many of them last week could not get on the system. I think it behooves us to support the teachers and the students."

Representatives from the Broward, Palm Beach, Pasco and Polk school districts also endorsed the proposed amendment.

But Republicans on the panel disagreed.

“The pressure helps our schools to continue to strive to do better,” said Rep. Janet Adkins, R-Fernandina Beach.

The proposed amendment was rejected.

The bill itself was approved by a unanimous vote. Frank called it an "excellent product."

"You have listened to us and we appreciate it," she said.

But Florida Education Association President Andy Ford expressed lingering concerns.

"We truly believe there needs to be a time out on the consequences for students, teachers and schools until we work through this year and see what the baseline data shows us," he said.

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