State Politics

Crist doesn’t sign political money bill

BY MARC CAPUTO and STEVE BOUSQUET

Herald/Times Tallahassee Bureau

TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Charlie Crist angered Republican legislative leaders Tuesday by vetoing a bill that would have resurrected their access to potent partisan fundraising machines known as leadership funds.

The elections bill (HB 1207) was a priority of GOP lawmakers, who want to use the funds as vessels for special interest money to influence elections and help favored candidates.

Republicans such as Sen. Mike Haridopolos, R-Melbourne, have said leadership funds would allow more “transparency’’ because they would give citizens a clear view of legislative leaders’ campaign finance activity, which is currently obscured because all party fundraising is mixed into one pot when the records are made public.

Leadership funds were banned 21 years ago when Democrats, in charge of the Legislature then, were embarrassed by a perception of pay-to-play politics.

Crist, a Republican, said leadership funds are a vestige of Florida’s political past that should be forgotten. He also referred to recent scandals at the Republican Party of Florida.

“In this climate, I’m just concerned about sort of putting a stamp of approval if you will on those kinds of funds,” Crist said. “I don’t think it’s the right thing to do nor the right time to do it.”

Haridopolos couldn’t be reached after the veto. The House sponsor, Rep. Seth McKeel, R-Lakeland, said he was “deeply disappointed’’ by Crist’s veto. Senate Republican leader Alex Diaz de la Portilla of Miami condemned Crist’s action.

“The governor is 100 percent wrong,” he said in a statement. He pointed out that the bill also would have required more disclosure by shadowy election groups known as 527s, named after the section of the federal tax code.

Florida used to regulate 527s — which the state called electioneering communication organizations or ECOs, but a federal judge wiped out state regulations of the groups last year, saying the law was too vague. The electioneering groups can raise and spend unlimited sums with no state oversight or disclosure at the state level.

Lawmakers aren’t likely to attempt to muster the two-thirds vote to override Crist’s veto. They can take portions of the bill that Crist likes — such as ECO regulation — and write them into other bills.

Diaz de la Portilla said the vetoed bill would have required disclosure of the financial activity of leadership funds. The special funds, known as affiliated party committees, not only empowered legislative leaders, but undercut the power of party bosses.

“As Gov. Crist knows all too well, unchecked power resting solely in a party chairman’s office is no way to account for how political party dollars are spent,” Diaz de la Portilla said in a written statement, taking a swipe at former Republican Party Chairman Jim Greer, whom Crist chose to lead the party after the 2006 elections.

Greer’s successor, Sen. John Thrasher, last week called for a state investigation into a consulting contract that benefited the former chairman. Greer’s attorneys say Thrasher and other Republicans were ginning up fake charges against Greer to avoid paying out a severance contract they signed.

Crist on Friday called for a federal investigation into party finances under Greer, the governor’s hand-picked choice to run the party. For more than a year, Crist had rebuffed calls for an investigation into the party as some Republican activists groused about Greer’s management and spending.

Crist has increasingly criticized his party in recent weeks as opponent Marco Rubio, a former House speaker from Miami, opened up a double-digit lead over him in the Republican race for U.S. Senate.

Democrats praised Crist’s veto, saying it stopped a bad fundraising law from going into effect.

Though Crist distanced himself from GOP leaders, some Republicans said he was moving closer to grassroots voters.

Sen. Paula Dockery, a Lakeland Republican running for governor, said rank-and-file Republicans have grown disillusioned with party leaders. They’re also angry at the way control of the GOP has been seized by a small cadre of Tallahassee insiders, she said, who engineered the removal of Greer and selected Thrasher of St. Augustine as his replacement.

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