National Politics

Google Fiber to leave Kentucky city, pay $3.8M for removal

ConnectHome and Google Fiber bring gigabit Ethernet to public housing

U.S. Housing Secretary Julián Castro visited the West Bluff public housing complex in Kansas City on Wednesday to announce the first of 1,300 area families in subsidized housing who will receive free or reduced-cost super-fast Internet connections
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U.S. Housing Secretary Julián Castro visited the West Bluff public housing complex in Kansas City on Wednesday to announce the first of 1,300 area families in subsidized housing who will receive free or reduced-cost super-fast Internet connections

Google Fiber is leaving Louisville, Kentucky, and has agreed to pay the city to remove its infrastructure.

The Courier Journal reports the office of Mayor Greg Fischer announced on Monday that Google will pay $3.8 million over 20 months. The city will work to remove items such as fiber cables and restore roads and other public spaces damaged by the service.

Google abruptly announced in February that it was leaving Louisville by mid-April. It cited several reasons for its departure, including a failed experiment to bury fiber optic cables in shallower trenches than used in other cities.

A Google Fiber general manager, Mark Strama, says the company will also donate $150,000 to the Community Foundation of Louisville’s Digital Inclusion Fund and 275 refurbished computers to the city’s housing authority.

VIDEO: Google Fiber celebrated its grand opening of the Raleigh Fiber Space Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017 in the 518 West Jones building in Glenwood South. The Fiber Space is a communal space where the public can try out free gigabit speed internet. Goo

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