A pro-Trump speaker, left, is confronted by an anti-Trump demonstrators outside the San Diego Convention Center where Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was scheduled to speak, Friday, May 27, 2016, in San Diego. Much of the internet has widened the partisan divide – but research conducted at Harvard Business School shows that Wikipedia’s collaborative editing and strong community standards helps bridge the gap, even on contentious topics.
A pro-Trump speaker, left, is confronted by an anti-Trump demonstrators outside the San Diego Convention Center where Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was scheduled to speak, Friday, May 27, 2016, in San Diego. Much of the internet has widened the partisan divide – but research conducted at Harvard Business School shows that Wikipedia’s collaborative editing and strong community standards helps bridge the gap, even on contentious topics. Lenny Ignelzi AP
A pro-Trump speaker, left, is confronted by an anti-Trump demonstrators outside the San Diego Convention Center where Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was scheduled to speak, Friday, May 27, 2016, in San Diego. Much of the internet has widened the partisan divide – but research conducted at Harvard Business School shows that Wikipedia’s collaborative editing and strong community standards helps bridge the gap, even on contentious topics. Lenny Ignelzi AP

Wikipedia might show us how to fix what’s wrong with the internet

October 25, 2016 11:30 PM