In this March 30, 1997, file photo, Tennessee head coach Pat Summitt holds up the net with her son Tyler after the Lady Vols defeated Old Dominion 68-59 to win the NCAA Division I Women’s Final Four Tournament in Cincinnati. Summitt, the winningest coach in Division I college basketball history who uplifted the women's game from obscurity to national prominence during her career at Tennessee, died Tuesday morning. She was 64.
In this March 30, 1997, file photo, Tennessee head coach Pat Summitt holds up the net with her son Tyler after the Lady Vols defeated Old Dominion 68-59 to win the NCAA Division I Women’s Final Four Tournament in Cincinnati. Summitt, the winningest coach in Division I college basketball history who uplifted the women's game from obscurity to national prominence during her career at Tennessee, died Tuesday morning. She was 64. AMY SANCETTA AP
In this March 30, 1997, file photo, Tennessee head coach Pat Summitt holds up the net with her son Tyler after the Lady Vols defeated Old Dominion 68-59 to win the NCAA Division I Women’s Final Four Tournament in Cincinnati. Summitt, the winningest coach in Division I college basketball history who uplifted the women's game from obscurity to national prominence during her career at Tennessee, died Tuesday morning. She was 64. AMY SANCETTA AP

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