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Miami Beach sanitation workers ramped up efforts to eliminate potential mosquito breeding grounds in the wake of news that Zika cases have been identified in the region’s tourism capital. Workers with pressure washers pushed stagnant water into gutters with 250-degree water to kill anything living in it. Sanitation trucks with vacuums sucked up water and debris. Larvicide pellets are being thrown into stormwater drains. CM Guerrero cmguerrero@miamiherald.com
Miami Beach sanitation workers ramped up efforts to eliminate potential mosquito breeding grounds in the wake of news that Zika cases have been identified in the region’s tourism capital. Workers with pressure washers pushed stagnant water into gutters with 250-degree water to kill anything living in it. Sanitation trucks with vacuums sucked up water and debris. Larvicide pellets are being thrown into stormwater drains. CM Guerrero cmguerrero@miamiherald.com

Florida Zika outbreak will be small and done by winter, scientists predict

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